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Band
Bands
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Band
Band [Heb. gāḏaḏ (Ps. 94:21), geḏûḏ (1 S. 30:8, 15, 23; 2 S. 4:2; 1 K. 11:24; 2 K. 13:20f; etc.), gûr (Ps. 56:6; 59:3), ḥeḇel (1 S. 10:5, 10), ḥeḇer (Hos. 6:9), ḥayil (Ezr. 8:22), ḥayyâ (2 S. 23:13), ḥēšeḇ (Ex. 28:8, 27f; 39:5, 20f; Lev. 8:7), ḥāṯal (Ezk. 16:4), aṯullâ (Job
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Band
Band. The “band of Roman soldiers” referred to in Matt. 27:27 and elsewhere was the tenth part of a legion. It was called a “cohort,” and numbered 400 to 600 men. [See Army.]
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Bands
Bands(1) of love (Hos. 11:4); (2) of Christ (Ps. 2:3); (3) uniting together Christ’s body the church (Col. 2:19; 3:14; Eph. 4:3); (4) the emblem of the captivity of Israel (Ezek. 34:27; Isa. 28:22; 52:2); (5) of brotherhood (Ezek. 37:15–28); (6) no bands to the wicked in their death (Ps. 73:4; Job 21:7;
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BAND
BANDThe English word has two generic meanings, each shading off into several specific meanings:1. that which holds together, binds or encircles: a bond;2. a company of men. The second sense may philologically and logically have been derived from the first, men being held together by social ties.
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Band
Band. In the New Testament this word designates a cohort of Roman foot-soldiers (Matt. 27:27; Mark 15:16; Acts 10:1; 21:31; 27:1), and also a company from the guards of the temple (John 18:3, 12). In the Old Testament, besides its common application to a troop or company, the word band, in its plural
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Band
band. This English term has various meanings and translates several Hebrew nouns and verbs. For example, the noun ḥāšûq H3122 is used with reference to the silver rings (KJV, “fillets”) put on the posts of the tabernacle (Exod. 27:10 et al.). The very different meaning “a group of people” is often
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Armband
ArmbandBone, glass, leather, metal, or textile worn around the upper arm, the forearm, or the wrist. Terminology is imprecise, archaeological typologies and type sequences have not been worked out, and there are multiple variants. In English, “armlet” is usually understood to designate an a. worn above
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Band
BAND: The Eng. word has two generic meanings, each shading off into several specific meanings: (1) that which holds together, binds or encircles: a bond; (2) a company of men. The second sense may philologically and logically have been derived from the first, men being held together by social ties. Both
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
BAND
BAND [חַיִלgedhudh, גְּדוּדkhayil, שָׂפָהsafah; σπεῖρα speira, σπείρω speirō]. 1. Group of people assembled for a common purpose. A gathering of people such as prophets (khayil; 1 Sam 10:5, 10), or shepherds (Isa 31:4), or revelers (Jer 15:17; compare REMNANT). A group of soldiers (Ezra 8:22; speira;
BAND, DECORATION
BAND, DECORATION [חָשׁוּקkhashuq]. This is a decorative element in the Priestly description of the Tabernacle construction in Exod 27, 36, and 38, which has been understood as metal bands that connected the PILLARs of the TABERNACLE to each other. They are described as being overlaid with gold in some