Loading…
Balm
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Balm
Balm (צֳרִי‎, tsoriy). Plant product taking the form of an ointment applied for the purpose of medicinal healing or to provide a pleasant aroma (Gen 37:25; Gen 43:11; Jer 8:22; 46:11; 51:8; Ezek 27:17).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Balm
BALM. A historically convenient English translation of the Heb word ṣŏrı̂, found in the OT just 6 times, all with reference to a plant or a derived plant product. The modern botanical identification cannot be established precisely. The LXX translated the Heb word as the Gk rhētinē “resin of pine.”
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Balm, Balsam
Balm, Balsam. Resinous plant gum used in medicine, or the plant from which it is derived.See Medicine and Medical Practice; Plants.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Balm
Balm [Heb. e, o; Gk. rētínē]; NEB also BALSAM (Gen. 43:11; Ezk. 27:17). An aromatic resin mentioned six times in the Bible and claiming widespread therapeutic usage in the ancient Near East. Its true identity is nonetheless difficult to establish. It was brought by Ishmaelites journeying
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Balm, Balsam
BALM, BALSAM Resinous plant gum used in medicine, or the plant from which it is derived. See Medicine and Medical Practice; Plants.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Balm
balm, the resin or gum of the balsam tree (Commiphora gileadensis), which was used as a scent for oils and perfumes as well as a medicine to heal wounds (Jer. 8:22). The resin is collected naturally or by incision, and it hardens into small nodules. Often referred to as a “spice,” it was traded throughout
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Balm
BalmA resinous plant exudate obtained through incisions in the bark (Heb. ṣĕrɩ̂/ṣ[rɩ̂). The Ishmaelites trade it with Egypt (Gen. 37:25), and Joseph receives it as a gift from Jacob (43:11). It also appears in a list of Judean exports to Tyre (Ezek. 27:17). While these references highlight the commercial
Balsam
BalsamA shrub (Balsamodendrium Opolbalsamum) which yields a spice favored as a fragrance (Heb. bōkem; Cant. 5:1, 13; cf. Exod. 35:28). Heb. bāḵāʾ (2 Sam. 5:23–24; 1 Chr. 14:14–15) probably indicates the mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.), which is more of a shrub than a tree and secretes a milky
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Balm
Balm (Heb. erî, ṣo). An aromatic, oily resin produced by the metabolism of various trees and shrubs and exuded when the tree is damaged. Its use for medicinal purposes is alluded to at Jer. 8:22; 46:11; it appears at Gen. 37:25 as an item of trade and at Gen. 43:11 as a gift.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Balm
BALM Also balsam, a sweet-smelling resin harvested from several trees that grew in Palestine and the Transjordan. Balm was esteemed highly for its soothing and healing properties (Jer 8:22; 46:11; 51:8) and was an important trade item (Gen 37:25, 43:11; Ezek 27:17). (See Gilead.)
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Balm
Balm (from balsam, Heb. tzorı̂, tezrı̂) occurs in Gen. 37:25; 43:11; Jer. 8:22; 46:11; 51:8; Ezek. 27:17. (It is an aromatic plant, or the resinous odoriferous sap or gum which exudes from such plants.) It is impossible to identify it with any certainty. It may represent the gum of the Pistacia lentiscus,
Rosin
Rosin. Properly “naphtha,” as it is both in the LXX and the Vulgate, as well as in the Peshito-Syriac. Pliny mentions naphtha as a product of Babylonia, similar in appearance to liquid bitumen, and having a remarkable affinity to fire.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Balm
Balmcontracted from Bal’sam, a general name for many oily or resinous substances which flow or trickle from certain trees or plants when an incision is made through the bark.(1.) This word occurs in the Authorized Version (Gen. 37:25; 43:11; Jer. 8:22; 46:11; 51:8; Ezek. 27:17) as the rendering of
Rosin
Rosinfound only in Authorized Version, margin, Ezek. 27:17, Heb. tsori, uniformly rendered elsewhere “balm” (q.v.), as here in the text. The Vulgate has resinam, rendered “rosin” in the Douay Version. As used, however, by Jerome, the Lat. resina denotes some odoriferous gum or oil.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Balm
Balmbalm, the resin or gum of the balsam tree (Commiphora gileadensis) which was used as a scent for oils and perfumes as well as a medicine to heal wounds (Jer. 8:22). The resin is collected naturally or by incision, and it hardens into small nodules. Often referred to as a ‘spice,’ it was traded
See also
Topics & Themes
Gum
Related