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Babylon
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The cultural and political center of Mesopotamia during much of the second and first millennia bc. Located in modern-day Iraq along one branch of the Euphrates River, about 59 miles southwest of Baghdad and 6 miles northeast of Hillah.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Babylon
Babylon (בבל‎, bbl; Βαβυλων, Babylōn; Akkadian: Bab-iliu; “the gate of god[s]”). The cultural and political center of Mesopotamia during much of the second and first millennia bc. Located in modern-day Iraq along one branch of the Euphrates River, about 59 miles southwest of Baghdad and 6 miles northeast
Babylon, Culture of
Babylon, Culture of Explores the religion, social structures, and economy of Babylon, a center of power in ancient Mesopotamia.
Babel, Tower of, Critical Issues
Babel, Tower of, Critical Issues Examines hypotheses for the origin, date, and composition of the Tower of Babel story (Gen 11:1–9).
Merathaim
Merathaim (מְרָתַיִם‎, merathayim). A name meaning “double rebellion” that is used to insult Babylon in an oracle in Jer 50:21.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Babylon (Place)
BABYLON (PLACE) [Heb bābel (בָּבֶל); Gk Babylōn (Βαβυλων)]. A major city in central Mesopotamia, located on the Euphrates (32°33´N; 44°24´E). It played an important role in the history of the ANE during the 2d and 1st millennia b.c. Its present name comes from the Hellenized form of the Akk Bab-Ilu,
Babel (Place)
BABEL (PLACE) [Heb bābel (בָּבֶל)]. The name given to a city in the plain of Shinar whose completion was thwarted by Yahweh’s intervention (Gen 11:1–9). Conventionally known as the “Tower of Babel” story, Gen 11:1–9 is actually about a city that features a tower (Heb migdāl), which was perhaps a fortress
Merathaim (Place)
MERATHAIM (PLACE) [Heb mĕrātayim (מְרָתַיִם)]. Derisive name for Babylon in Jer 50:21. It is presumed to be a wordplay on marratum, the Akkadian name for the marshy region in S Babylonia where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers converge at the Persian Gulf (“the sea of the Chaldeans,” CAD M/1: 285 and
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Babylon, Babylonia
Babylon, Babylonia. Land and people of southern Mesopotamia. Politically, Babylonia refers to the ancient kingdoms that flourished in southern Mesopotamia, especially in the 7th and 6th centuries bc, whose capital city was Babylon (or Bab-ilu, meaning “gate of god”). The term can also be used geographically
Babel
Babel. Translation of a Hebrew word in Genesis 10:10 and 11:9. Elsewhere it is translated “Babylonia” or “Babylon” (2 Kgs 17:24, etc.). The rendering Babel in the Genesis passages is intended to relate the name to the early cultural setting reflected by Genesis 11:1–9, especially to the attempt to build
Merathaim
Merathaim. Name that Jeremiah uses in reference to God’s judgment upon Babylon (Jer 50:21). Though it means “double rebellion” or “twofold rebel,” it is a word play on the name for southern Babylonia, Marratu. Thus, God says, “Go up against the land, ‘Twofold rebel’ … and utterly destroy it!”
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Babylon
Babylon baʹbə-lon; BABEL bāʹbəl (Gen. 10:10; 11:9) [Heb. bābel—‘gate of god’; Akk. bāb-ili, bāb-ilāni—‘gate of god(s)’; Gk. Babylōn; Pers. Babirush]. The capital city of Babylonia. I. Location II. Name III. Early HistoryA. FoundationB. Old Babylonian PeriodC. Middle Babylonian PeriodD.
Babylon in the NT
Babylon in the NT Babylon (GK. Babylōn) is used in the NT both literally and symbolically. In Mt. 1:11f, 17; Acts 7:43 the old Mesopotamian city is plainly meant. These all refer to the Captivity in Babylon.All the references to Babylon in Revelation are evidently symbolic: cf. 14:8; 16:19; 17:5;
Babylonia
Babylonia bab-ə-lōʹnə-ə. Southern Mesopotamia (modern south Iraq) was the site of the first civilization (Gen. 10:10), first called Sumer and Akkad and later Chaldea. Abraham migrated from here to Palestine (Gen. 11:31). The Babylonian army overran Judah and took the Jews into exile there. Throughout
Merathaim
Merathaim merʹə-thā-əm [Heb merāṯayim—‘two rebellions’]. A name used for “Babylon” in Jer. 50:21. It is believed to be a wordplay on Bab nâr marratu, “bitter river” (i.e., the Persian Gulf), since the root of both words is mrr, “bitter.” The name Pekod, used similarly in the same verse, may be
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Babylon, Babylonia
BABYLON, BABYLONIA Land of southern Mesopotamia. Politically, Babylonia refers to the ancient kingdoms that flourished in southern Mesopotamia, especially in the seventh and sixth centuries bc, whose capital city was Babylon (or Bab-ilu, meaning “gate of god”). The term can also be used geographically
Babel
BABEL Translation of a Hebrew word in Genesis 10:10 and 11:9. Elsewhere it is translated “Babylonia” or “Babylon” (see 2 Kgs 17:24). The rendering “Babel” in the Genesis passages is intended to relate the name to the early cultural setting reflected by Genesis 11:1–9, especially to the attempt to build
Merathaim
MERATHAIM Name that Jeremiah uses in reference to God’s judgment upon Babylon (Jer 50:21). Though it means “double rebellion” or “twofold rebel,” it is a wordplay on the name for southern Babylonia, Marratu. Thus, God says, “Go up against the land, Two-fold rebel … and utterly destroy it!”
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Babylon
Babylon (bab´uh-luhn; from Akkadian bab ili, “the gate of the god”; Heb. babel), in the Bible, both the Mesopotamian region, more properly called Babylonia, and its capital city. The city of Babylon covered over two thousand acres, making it one of the largest ancient Mesopotamian sites. It is located
Accad
Accad (ak´ad; also Agade, Akkad).1 A city of Nimrod’s kingdom in the land of Shinar (Gen. 10:10). The association with cities in Gen. 10 named Babel and Erech establishes the Mesopotamian location known from numerous extrabiblical textual, artistic, and literary sources. The precise location of the
Babel
Babel (bay´buhl), the Hebrew name for Babylon. It was the site of the episode in Gen. 11:1–9, which recounts the origin of separate languages. Once humankind spoke one language, but when people settled in Shinar (understood by most modern scholars as Sumer), they purposed to make bricks and building
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Babylon
BABYLON. An ancient city-state situated on both banks of the river Euphrates in the land of Shinar (later called Chaldea), c. 40–50 miles S of modern Baghdad and 300 miles N of the Persian Gulf. Its name was derived from the Akkad. babilu—“gate of god.” It eventually became the capital city of the Babylonian
Babylonia
BABYLONIAThe Land and Its PeopleBabylonia is located in the alluvial plain between the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers at the eastern end of the Fertile Crescent in western Asia. Scarcely 40 miles wide, it comprises about 8,000 square miles and is approximately the size of New Jersey. The city of Babylon
Merathaim
A Greek mercenary soldier hired by Seleucids, found at Sidon. Istanbul MuseumMERATHAIM. Only used in the dual. In Jer 50:21 it is a play on a name applied to S Babylon, mât marrâti, land of “double rebellion,”. designation of Babylonia.
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Babylonia
BABYLONIA. The territory in SW Asia, now S Iraq, which derived its name from the capital city of *Babylon. It was also called *Shinar (Gn. 10:10; 11:2; Is. 11:11; Jos. 7:21, av ‘Babylonish’) and, later, ‘the land of the Chaldeans’ (Je. 24:5; Ezk. 12:13). In earlier antiquity it bore the name of Akkad
Babel
BABEL (Heb. Bāḇel, ‘gate of god’; also *Babylon).The name of one of the chief cities founded by Nimrod in the land of Shinar (Sumer), ancient Babylonia. It is named with Erech and Accad (Gn. 10:10) and according to Babylonian tradition was founded by the god Marduk and destroyed by Sargon c. 2350 bc
Merathaim
MERATHAIM (Heb. merāṯayim). A term found in Je. 50:21, having the dual meaning of ‘double bitterness’ or ‘double rebellion’. Some hold that the dual expresses merely intensity of rebellion against the Lord (cf. v. 24); other scholars now suggest an identification of the word with Bab. nāri marrātu
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Babylon
Babylon (Sum. KÁ.DINGIR.RA; Akk. bāb-ilim; Heb. bāḇel; Gk. Babyɩ̂n)An enormously important city in antiquity (“gate of the god”), situated on the Euphrates River SW of Baghdad.Babylon’s earliest history is obscure because of the lack of written sources and the virtual obliteration of the earliest
Babel
Babel (Heb. bāḇel), TOWER OFA “city and a tower” at the center of a clash of divine and human wills portrayed in Gen. 11:1–9. Babel (Gen. 11:9) means “gate of God” (Akk. bab-ilu). The biblical writer, however, opts for a play on the sound of the word and explains the name by using the Hebrew verb
Merathaim
Merathaim (Heb. mĕrāṯayim)The southern region of Babylonia where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers merge and empty into the Persian Gulf (Jer. 50:21). The Hebrew representation of the Akkadian name of the region, māt marratɩ̂m (taken from the name of the Persian Gulf, nar marrâtu, “bitter river”;
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Babylon
Babylon [băbˊə lən] (Heb. bāḇel “gate of God”; Gk. Babylōn).* Capital of Babylonia, situated on the Euphrates river approximately 80km. (50 mi.) south of modern Baghdad.The Hebrew name (translated “Babel” only at Gen. 10:10; 11:9) is based on the Akkadian form Bāb-ilī “gate of god,”
Babylonia
Babylonia [băbˊə lōˊnĭ ə].† A major civilization in southern Mesopotamia, situated between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, which flourished from the middle of the third through the late first millennia B.C. The Greeks named the country after the capital Babylon (Gk. Babylōn; Akk. Bāb-ili,
Merathaim
Merathaim [mĕrˊə thāˊəm] (Heb. merāṯayim). The southern region of Babylonia where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers merge and empty into the Persian Gulf (Jer. 50:21). The Hebrew representation of the Akkadian name of the region, māt marratîm (taken from the name of the Persian Gulf, nar marrâtu
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Babylon (City Of); Babylonians
BABYLON (CITY OF); BABYLONIANS One of the most important cities of Mesopotamia, whose ancient name probably meant ‘the gate of the gods’. The ancient Hebrews understood the name differently: ‘Therefore is the name of it called Babel; because the Lord did there confound the language of all the earth’ (Gen.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Babylon
BABYLON, BABYLONIA The name of an ancient empire centered in Mesopotamia. The empire took its name from its capital city, which was built on the east bank of the Euphrates River; its territory covered modern southern Iraq. Babylon had a significant influence on the history of the Near East and was particularly
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