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Baali
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A title associated with the god Baal meaning “my master.” In Hosea 2:16 the Lord rejects this title for a better one: Ishi, which means “my husband.” Through the prophet Hosea, God chose a name that was not associated with the pagan Baal, but instead emphasized the covenant established with God’s people.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Baali
Baali (בַּעֲלִי‎, ba'aliy). A title associated with the god Baal meaning “my master.” In Hosea 2:16 the Lord rejects this title for a better one: Ishi, which means “my husband.” Through the prophet Hosea, God chose a name that was not associated with the pagan Baal, but instead emphasized the covenant
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Baali
Baali. Hebrew title meaning “my Lord” or “my master” (Hos 2:16 kjv). The title was rejected by God because of its association with the Canaanite Baal. God chose instead to be addressed with the Hebrew word Ishi, “my husband,” of similar meaning but untainted by pagan associations. Thus, in a prophetic
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Baali
Baali bāʹə-lī [Heb. ba‘a—‘my master’]. A generic title of deity in the ancient Near East. In Hos. 2:16f God rejects this in favor of Ishi (“my husband”), in order to repudiate the ethos of Canaanite religion and reassert the obligations of the Sinai covenant.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Baali
BAALI* Hebrew title meaning “my lord” or “my master” (Hos 2:16). The title was rejected by God because of its association with the Canaanite Baal. God chose instead to be addressed with the Hebrew word ’ishi, “my husband,” which has a similar meaning but is untainted by pagan associations. Thus, in a
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Baali
BAALI. The Heb. word ba’al means “owner,” “husband,” “master” (KB), and the suffix i adds the personal possessive “my.” The term “Baal” had come to be applied to a Semitic deity (particularly the storm-god Hadad) and to local fertility deities, “owners” of the cities. There was also another word for
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Baali
Baali [bāˊə lī] Heb. ba˓a.† Symbolic name for God, depicting his relationship with his people. Because it connotes the Canaanite Baal, or at least the quality of a pagan human-divine relationship, Hosea substitutes the name Ishmi (“my husband”; so RSV) to call to mind Israel’s covenant (Hos.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Baali
BA´ALI (bāʹa-lî; “my master”). “You will call Me Ishi / And will no longer call Me Baali” (Hos. 2:16). The meaning is that Israel will enter into right relation with God, in which she will look toward Him as her husband (Ishi) and not merely as Baal, “owner, master.” Calling or naming is a designation
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Baali
Baalimy lord, a title the prophet (Hos. 2:16) reproaches the Jewish church for applying to Jehovah, instead of the more endearing title Ishi, meaning “my husband.”
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Baali
BAALI [BAY uh lih] (my lord, my master) — a term used in the KJV that refers to a subservient relationship either to a ruler or master or to Baal. Because of Israel’s idolatry, the prophet Hosea used the term to explain God’s relationship to the nation as one of a master over a servant, rather than one
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BAALI
BAALI<ba’-a-li> בַּעֲלִי‎ [bàali], “my master”): Baal, a common name for all heathen gods, had in common practice been used also of Yahweh. Hosea (2:16, 17) demands that Yahweh be no longer called [Bàali] (“my Baal” = “my lord”) but ’Ishi (“my husband”), and we find that later the Israelites
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Baali
BAALI (Bāʹ ȧl·ī) Form of address meaning “my lord,” or “my Baal.” Hosea used a play on words to look to a day when Israel would no longer worship Baal (Hos. 2:16). He said Israel, the bride, would refer to Yahweh, her God and husband, as “my man” (Hb. ʾishi) but not as “my lord” (Hb. baali). Even
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Baali
Baali bay′uh-li, bah′uh-li. KJV transliteration of baʿlî (“my Baal,” that is, “my master”), a name used by some in Hosea’s day to describe God (Hos. 2:16). Because of this name’s pagan associations, God preferred and demanded that he be called ʾîšî (“my husband”), which emphasized the covenant relationship