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Baal
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Baal
Baal (בַּעַל‎, ba'al). The Canaanite storm god and bringer of rain. Chief of the Canaanite pantheon.
Baal, Critical Issues
Baal, Critical Issues (בַּעַל‎, ba'al). Reviews scholarly issues concerning the Canaanite god of storms and fertility as he is depicted in Ugaritic literature and the Old Testament.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Baal (Deity)
BAAL (DEITY) [Heb baʿal (בַּעַל)]. Canaanite storm and fertility god. The name, which means “lord,” is an epithet of the god Hadad (lit. “thunderer”). Well-known from the OT, he is now extremely well-attested in the Ugaritic texts, in addition to being mentioned in other ancient texts.A. Baal in Extrabiblical
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Baal
Baal. Name of the most prominent Canaanite deity. As the god of fertility in the Canaanite pantheon (roster of gods), Baal’s sphere of influence included agriculture, animal husbandry, and human sexuality. The word Baal occurs in the OT in combination with other terms, such as place-names (Baal-peor,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Baal
Baal bāʹəl [Heb. ba‘al < Bab Belu. or Bel—‘lord’; Gk. Baal]. The supreme fertility-god of the Canaanites. I. Name II. Character III. Worship IV. Various Forms of Baal
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Baal (Idol)
BAAL (Idol) Name of the most prominent Canaanite deity. As the god of fertility in the Canaanite pantheon (roster of gods), Baal’s sphere of influence included agriculture, animal husbandry, and human sexuality. The word Baal occurs in the OT in combination with other terms, such as place-names (Baal-peor,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Baal
Baal (bay´uhl, bah-ahl´), a Canaanite god. The Semitic word ba‘al means “owner,” “husband,” “lord,” or “master.” It can be used as a common or proper noun. In the latter case it refers to the god Baal. In the Bible it is not always clear which use is intended. There is an additional complication in using
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Baal
BAAL. The Hebrew noun ba‘al means ‘master’, ‘possessor’ or ‘husband’. Used with suffixes, e.g. Baal-peor or Baal-berith, the word may have retained something of its original sense; but in general Baal is a proper name in the OT, and refers to a specific deity, Hadad, the W Semitic storm-god, the most
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Baal
Baal (Heb. baʿal) (DEITY)The Canaanite storm- and fertility-god. As an epithet for various West Semitic deities, especially Hadad, the name means “lord,” designating a legal state of ownership or social superiority. With the obvious exception of Yahweh, Baal is the most significant deity in the OT.
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Baal
BAAL בעלI. The name baʿal is a common Semitic noun meaning ‘lord, owner’. Applied to a god it occurs about 90 times in the OT. The LXX transcribes Βααλ, Vulgate Baal, plural Βααλιμ and Baalim. Though normally an appellative, the name is used in Ugaritic religion as the proper name of a deity. Also in
Baal Toponyms
BAAL TOPONYMSI. The nine toponyms →Baal-gad, →Baal-hamon, →Baal-hazor, →Baal-hermon, →Baal-judah, →Baal-meon, →Baal-perazim, →Baal-shalisha, and →Baal-tamar include various descriptive combinations which are compounded with the divine name or appellative Baal. They are all located in the Canaanite hill
Baal-Zaphon
BAAL-ZAPHON בעל צפוןI. Baal-zaphon literally means the ‘lord of (mount) →Zaphon’ and it is a designation of the Ugaritic god →Baal. Due to mount Zaphon’s image as the cosmic mountain par excellence in Northwest-Semitic religions, the name ‘Baal-zaphon’ was transferred to further Baal-sanctuaries outside
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Baal
BAAL (Hebrew, “Lord” or “Master”) The name of the most important Canaanite deity, the god of rain, storms, and fertility. The god was worshipped under a variety of titles and in various ways. In Canaanite mythology, Baal merges with the Semitic storm god Hadad (“Thunderer”). Although El was the father
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Baal
Baal (Heb. בַּעַל, Gk. Βάαλ or Βαάλ). The word, which means literally ‘lord’ or ‘owner’, e.g. of a house (Ex. 22:7, [EVV 22:8], Jgs. 19:22), was used esp. of the Semitic deities who were held to produce agricultural and animal fertility. The discoveries at *Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in Syria from
Key passages
Jdg 2:11–13

The Israelites did evil in the eyes of Yahweh, and they served the Baals. They abandoned Yahweh the God of their ancestors, who brought them out from the land of Egypt. They followed other gods from the gods of the people who were around them; and they …

1 Ki 16:31–33

If it wasn’t enough that he went after the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, he also took as wife Jezebel the daughter of Ethbaal the king of the Sidonians. He went and served Baal and bowed down to him. And he built an altar to Baal in the house of Baal which he had built in Samaria. Ahab …

2 Ki 11:17–18

Then Jehoiada made a covenant between Yahweh and the king and the people, that the people should be as a people for Yahweh, and also a covenant between the king and the people. Then all the people of the land went to the temple of Baal and tore it down, and its altars and its images they …