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Asylum
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Asylum
Asylum The custom of fleeing to sacred places to obtain the protection of a deity. Israel allowed people to claim asylum by taking hold of the horns of the altar (Exod 21:14; 1 Kgs 1:50, 2:28) or using cities of refuge (Num 35:1–34; Deut 19:1–13; Josh 20:1–3).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Asylum
Asylum. Place of refuge where a fugitive from justice is immune to arrest or retribution; also, the protection afforded by such a place. An equivalent term is “sanctuary” (originally meaning “holy place”), from the ancient custom of seeking asylum at an altar or in a temple. Thus Adonijah (1 Kgs 1:50–53)
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Asylum
ASYLUM* Place of refuge where a fugitive from justice is immune to arrest or retribution; also, the protection afforded by such a place. An equivalent term is “sanctuary” (originally meaning “holy place”), from the ancient custom of seeking asylum at an altar or in a temple. Thus Adonijah (1 Kgs 1:50–53)
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Asylum
ASYLUM. The custom of flight to sacred places to secure at least the temporary protection of a deity was known to ancient man in all areas of the earth. The ancient Greeks and Romans found asylum at the altars, temples, and holy shrines. Even the statues of Roman emperors afforded such, and the Roman
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Asylum
ASYLUM (Heb. miqlāṭ). A place of safety where even a criminal might be free from violence from the avenger.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ASYLUM
ASYLUM<a-si’-lum>: The custom of fleeing to specially sacred places to obtain the protection of a deity is found all over the world (Post, Grundriss, II, 252 ff). In ancient Israel we meet with it in two forms — the asylum of the altar and the asylum of the cities of refuge. The altar at the House of
A Catholic Dictionary
Asylum
asylum. A place to which a criminal, pursued by the ministers of justice, may escape, and where so long as he remains he cannot be arrested. Such asylums, the inviolable character of which was nearly always connected with some notion of the religious sanctity of the spot, were common among the nations
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Asylum
Asy′lum means, literally, a place where pillage is forbidden (Greek, a (negative), sulon, right of pillage). The ancients set apart certain places of refuge, where the vilest criminals were protected, both from private and public assaults.
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Asylum
Asylum (a place of refuge).—In ancient times, sacred places, especially the temples and altars of the gods, were appointed as asylums to which criminals, as well as persecuted individuals, might flee for refuge; and to molest them in such places, was regarded as an impiety. They were, however, sometimes
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Asylum
asylum. As a political term, the protection granted by one country to *refugees from another country, usually in response to political, ethnic or religious *persecution. Ethical issues connected with asylum include such matters as asylum as a right, the conditions under which the granting of asylum is
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Asylum
asylum. The right of asylum is codified in four biblical passages (Exod. 21:12–14; Num. 35:9–34; Deut. 19:1–13; Josh. 20:7–9). The purpose of this law was to provide a place where the accidental homicide might dwell. The place could be the altar of Yahweh or the cities of refuge. The former is illustrated
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Asylum
ASYLUM, a-sīʹlum: The custom of fleeing to specially sacred places to obtain the protection of a deity is found all over the world (Post, Grundriss, II, 252 ff). In ancient Israel we meet with it in two forms—the asylum of the altar and the asylum of the cities of refuge. The altar at the House of God