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Associations
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Voluntary groups in the Graeco-Roman world formed for social, religious, professional, and political purposes (Stambaugh, New Testament, 124–25). An integral feature of life in the Graeco-Roman world leading up to and through the New Testament era.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Associations
Associations Voluntary groups in the Graeco-Roman world formed for social, religious, professional, and political purposes (Stambaugh, New Testament, 124–25). An integral feature of life in the Graeco-Roman world leading up to and through the New Testament era.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Associations, Clubs, Thiasoi
ASSOCIATIONS, CLUBS, THIASOI. Clubs, guilds, and corporations were a feature of the Greco-Roman world from the 4th century on into the Roman imperial period. Most of the information about these organizations is derived from inscriptions and documentary papyri.According to Aristotle, the essence of association
Dictionary of New Testament Background
Associations
ASSOCIATIONSDuring the Hellenistic era, voluntary associations of various types began to flourish. In Greek, such organizations are typically referred to as orgeones, thiastoi or eranistai, while the typical Latin designation is collegia. Lists of known associations in the Hellenistic era amount to
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Confraternities
Confraternities or Associations (Religious).—Religious associations are voluntary societies formed among the Faithful, with the object of furthering their own salvation or the salvation of their fellow-men. They may be divided into confraternities or sodalities, and charitable societies. Confraternities
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ASSOCIATIONS
ASSOCIATIONS, COLLEGIA, CLUBS. The term associations and its cognates (e.g., clubs, guilds, the Latin collegia), are used by modern scholars to refer to a large number of chronologically and geographically diverse groups of people in antiquity. These relatively small groups of men and/or women with a