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Arsaces
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A name adopted by thirty some Parthian kings after Arsaces I, who founded the kingdom in 250 bc. The sixth in this line (known as Mithridates before becoming king) is said to have captured Demetrius II, a Seleucid ruler and oppressor of the Jews (1 Macc 14:1–3). Rome forbade Arsaces VI, among other kings, to make war on their Jewish allies (see also 1 Macc 15:22).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Arsaces
Arsaces (Ἀρσάκης, Arsakēs). A name adopted by thirty some Parthian kings after Arsaces I, who founded the kingdom in 250 bc. The sixth in this line (known as Mithridates before becoming king) is said to have captured Demetrius II, a Seleucid ruler and oppressor of the Jews (1 Macc 14:1–3). Rome forbade
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Arsaces (Person)
ARSACES (PERSON) [Gk Arsakēs (Ἀρσακης)]. Name or title of Parthian kings, including the one who captured Demetrius II (1 Macc 14:2–3). The name may have been simply a title used by Parthian kings who claimed descent from Artaxerxes II, whose name was Arsaces before he took the Persian throne.Appian
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Arsaces
Arsaces är-sāʹsēz, ärʹsə-sēz [GK. Arsakēs]; NEB ARSAKES. The common name assumed by all the Parthian kings. The name is mentioned in 1 Macc. 14:1–3 in connection with the history of Demetrius, one of the Greek (Seleucid) kings of Syria, and successor of Antiochus Epiphanes the oppressor of the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Arsaces
ARSACES Title shared by Parthian rulers beginning with Arsaces I, founder of the kingdom (250? bc). The Parthian kingdom under Arsaces VI (Mithridates I) grew to include Media and Persia among other nations, thereby encroaching upon Seleucid territory. Syrian king Demetrius Nicator retaliated in 141
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Arsaces
Arsaces (Gk. Arsakēs)A Parthian military leader, who in the mid-3rd century b.c.e. rebelled against Seleucus II and established a dynasty that continued until the 3rd century c.e. Arsaces became the name that all Parthian kings adopted. Parthia gained official independence from Antiochus III, who was
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Arsaces
Arsaces [ärˊsə sēz] (Gk. Arsakēs).† The throne name of some thirty Parthian kings of a dynasty founded when Arsaces I rebelled against the Seleucid king Antiochus II Soter (ca. 250 B.C.).Arsaces VI (Mithridates I; 171–138) fostered the rise of the Parthian Empire through the conquest of a vast
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ARSACES
ARSACES<ar-sa’-sez> <ar’-sa-sez> ([ ʼΑρσάκης, Arsakes]): The common name assumed by all the Parthian kings, is mentioned in 1 Macc 14:1-3, and in 15:22 in connection with the history of Demetrius, one of the Greek, or Seleucid, kings of Syria, and successor to Antiochus Epiphanes, the oppressor
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
ARSACES
ARSA′CES (Ἀρσάκης), the name of the founder of the Parthian empire, which was also borne by all his successors, who were hence called the Arsacidae. Pott (Etymologische Forschungen, ii. p. 172) supposes that it signifies the “Shah or King of the Arii;” but it occurs as a Persian name long before the
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Arsaces
Arsaces ahr′suh-seez (Ἀρσάκης). An Old Persian name borne by several Medo-Persian kings. It was also the name of the founder of the Parthian empire (c. 250 b.c.) and was then assumed as a title by subsequent Parthian kings. The Arsaces who is said to have captured the Seleucid ruler Demetrius II (1
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Arsaces
ARSACES, är-sāʹsēz, ärʹsa-sēz (Ἀρσάκης, Arsákēs: The common name assumed by all the Parthian kings, is mentioned in 1 Macc 14:1–3, and in 15:22 in connection with the history of Demetrius, one of the Gr, or Seleucid, kings of Syria, and successor to Antiochus Epiphanes, the oppressor of the
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ARSACES
ARSACES ahr´suh-seez [Ἀρσάκης Arsakēs]. The Arsacids were an Iranian royal dynasty that dominated Parthia for almost five centuries from ca. 250 bce–224 ce. The sixth Arsacid (= Mithradates I; r. 179–139/8 bce) defeated the Seleucid Demetrius II and imprisoned him (1 Macc 14:1–3). According to Josephus,
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