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Armenian Religion
Aryan Religion
Dictionaries
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ARMENIAN; ARYAN; RELIGION
ARMENIAN; ARYAN; RELIGION<ar-me’-ni-an>, <ar’-i-an>. This greatly resembled that of Persia, though Zoroastrianism and its dualistic system were not professed. We are thus enabled to judge how far the religion of the Avesta is due to Zoroaster’s reformation. Aramazd (Ahura Mazda), creator of heaven and
A Catholic Dictionary
Armenian Christians
armenian Christians. The native legends recount the preaching of the Gospel to the Armenian nation by Thaddeus, one of the seventy disciples, but the conversion of the Armenian people as a whole was brought about by their great apostle, Gregory the Illuminator, whose efforts were supported by King Tiridates
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Aryan
AryanAryan is the name that was formerly given to a people who were thought to have settled in prehistoric times in ancient Iran and the northern Indian subcontinent. They were said to speak an archaic Indo-European language. The theory of an “Aryan race” appeared in the mid-19th century and was favored
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Armenians
Arme′nians. A religious sect so called from Arme′nia, where Christianity was introduced in the second century. They attribute only one nature to Christ and hold that the Spirit proceeds from the Father only. They enjoin the adoration of saints, have some peculiar ways of administering baptism and the
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Armenia
ArmeniaGeography has determined the political, social, and economic history of A. (see map 10, J4). South of the Caucasus, a coiling web of volcanic mountains and intervening plateaux formed a natural barrier between Anatolia’s Byzanto-Roman civilization to the west and the often proselytizing Zoroastrianism
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Armenian, Aryan, Religion
ARMENIAN, är-mēʹni-an (ARYAN, ärʹi-an, arʹi-an) RELIGION. This greatly resembled that of Persia, though Zoroastrianism and its dualistic system were not professed. We are thus enabled to judge how far the religion of the Avesta is due to Zoroaster’s reformation. Aramazd (Ahura Mazdā), creator of heaven
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
Armenian Rite
ARMENIAN RITE. Akin to the old *Antiochene rite (ancestor of the present *Byzantine rite), the Armenian rite preserves original developments and influences from other sources (*Jerusalem, the *Syriac churches) from the *liturgy’s formative period (4th–6th c.?); elements from Western liturgies were incorporated