Loading…
Arius
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Arius
Arius (Ἄρειος, Areios). A king of Sparta mentioned in Jonathan’s letter to the Spartans as having corresponded with the Jewish high priest Onias (1 Maccabees 12:7).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Arius, Arianism
ARIUS, ARIANISM. Arius (256–336 c.e.), a presbyter of the Baucalis region of Alexandria (Boulerand 1964: 175), began a controversy ca. 318 (Schneemelcher 1954: 394) with Bishop Alexander of Alexandria over the nature of Christ’s relation to the Father (Gregg and Groh 1977: 263). This controversy led
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Arius
Arius ârʹē-əs [GK. Areios], AV AREUS. A king of Sparta, Arius I (309–265 b.c.), who wrote a letter to Onias the high priest (1 Macc. 12:7, 20–23). There were two Spartan kings named Arius, and three high priests named Onias.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Arius
Arius (d. 336), heresiarch. There is much divergence between the authorities for his life. He was prob. born in Libya, between c. 260 and 280, and was a pupil of *Lucian of Antioch; if *Sozomen (HE 1. 15) can be trusted, he was ordained deacon by St *Peter, Bp. of *Alexandria (d. 311), who later
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ARIUS
ARIUS<a-ri’-us>, <a’-ri-us> ([ Ά̓ρης, Ares]): The reading of the Vulgate (Jerome’s Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) adopted in the Revised Version (British and American) for the former reading Areus and Areios of Josephus. A king of Sparta (309-265 BC) who wrote the letter to Onias, the high priest, given
The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians
Arius
Arius (ca. 250–336). Theologian whose characteristic doctrine, known as Arianism, incited the Trinitarian debates of the fourth century and was condemned by the councils of ⇒Nicaea (325) and ⇒Constantinople (381).It is said that A. was a native of Libya, and that he had studied under ⇒Lucian of Antioch.
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
ARIUS
ARIUS or AREIUS (Ἄρειος), the celebrated heretic, is said to have been a native of Libya, and must have been born shortly after the middle of the third century after Christ. His father’s name appears to have been Ammonius. In the religious disputes which broke out at Alexandria in a. d. 306, Arius
DAREIUS
DAREIUS or DARI′US (Δαρεῖος, Δαρειαῖος, Ctes., Heb. דַּרְיָוֶש‎, i. e. Daryavesh), the name of several kings of Persia. Like such names in general, it is no doubt a significant title. Herodotus (vi. 98) says that it means ἑρξείης; but the meaning of this Greek word is doubtful. Some take it to be
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Arius
ARIUS (Ἄρειος), the father of Arianism, was born about the middle of the 3rd century (256) in Libya, according to other accounts in Alexandria,a and ordained deacon by Peter, and presbyter by Achillas of Alexandria. Arius denied the eternity and essential divinity of Christ; but held that Christ was
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Arius
Arius air′ee-uhs (Ἄρειος. “devoted to Ares, warlike”). (1) King of Sparta (1 Macc. 12:7, 20), said to have written a letter in which he affirmed that the Spartans and the Jews were brothers descended from Abraham (cf. v. 21).(2) An ascetic pastor of Baucalis Church in Alexandria (born c. a.d. 250).
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Arius, Arianism
ARIUS, ARIANISMArius (c. 250–336) was a presbyter in Alexandria who taught that the Son of God was not of the same substance as the Father and that he was created out of nothing. His bishop, Alexander of Alexandria, strongly opposed Arius’s teachings. Arius’s heresy was condemned at the Council of Nicaea.
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Arius
Arius, Arianism. Arius (ca. 250–336) was a priest in Alexandria whose ideas gave rise to one of theology’s most enduring doctrinal controversies. Libyan by birth, he was well educated and a popular teacher. Most of what we know about him comes from his opponents, though we have access to a few letters
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Arius
ARIUS, a-rīʹus, āʹri-us (Ἄρης, Árēs): The reading of the Vulg adopted in RV for the former reading Areus and Areios of Jos. A king of Sparta (309–265 BC) who wrote the letter to Onias, the high priest, given in 1 Macc 12:7, 20–23. There were two Spartan kings named Arius, and three high priests