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Aristobulus (Pseudepigrapha)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who probably wrote in the second century bc. His writing is often grouped with the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, since it is nonbiblical Jewish writing from the same period.Aristobulus’ work was addressed to a king Ptolemy whom he says is descended from [Ptolemy II] Philadelphus. Eusebius of Caesarea and Clement of Alexandria indicate that the king in question is Ptolemy VI Philometor (186–145 bc), and this is probably correct. Eusebius also identifies the philosopher Aristobulus with the Aristobulus mentioned in 2 Maccabees 1:10, but this is impossible to confirm (Eusebius, Praep. ev. 8.9.38).Five quotations from Aristobulus’ work are preserved in Eusebius (Ecclesiastical History 7.32.16–18; Preparation for the Gospel 8.10; 13.12; 7.14.1). Some of the same passages are also quoted by Clement of Alexandria.Aristobulus’ work deals with the relationship between Jewish thought and Greek philosophy and culture. He argues that the date of Passover and the holiness of the seventh day are in accordance with principles of cosmic order known to the Greeks (Fragments 1 and 5) and that Greek poets and philosophers were familiar with the Torah in a pre-Septuagint Greek translation and derived some of their ideas from it (Fragments 3 and 4). He also defends the use of anthropomorphic language to describe God, arguing that it is metaphorical (Fragments 2 and 4).In the course of his argument, Aristobulus cites Greek authors who he claims borrowed from Moses or were otherwise in accord with the Torah. Some of these quotations are known from the works of the authors he cites, while others are probably Jewish inventions falsely attributed to these authors. One of these texts, which he quotes at length, is known as the Orphica. Some of the quotations Aristobulus attributes to Greek authors are also quoted in early Christian sources and seem to be drawn from a separate Jewish list of such quotes.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Aristobulus the Jewish Philosopher
Aristobulus the Jewish Philosopher A Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who probably wrote in the second century bc. His writing is often grouped with the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, since it is nonbiblical Jewish writing from the same period.Aristobulus’ work was addressed to a king Ptolemy whom he says
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Aristobulus (OT Pseudepigrapha)
ARISTOBULUS (OT PSEUDEPIGRAPHA). Jewish philosopher-exegete who flourished in Alexandria in the 2d century b.c.e. He wrote a work in Greek, possibly multivolumed and entitled Explanations of the Book of Moses, of which only several short fragments survive. The exegetically focused exposition employed
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Aristobulus of Paneas
Aristobulus of Paneas (3rd–2nd cent, bc), Jewish philosopher of *Alexandria who most prob. taught some time between 180 and 145 bc. His Commentary on the Law, fragments of which are preserved by *Eusebius (Praep. Ev. 8. 10 and 13. 12 and HE 7. 32. 17), seeks to prove that the OT was the source
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Aristobulus
Aristobulus air′is-tob′yuh-luhs (Ἀριστόβουλος G755, “best advisor”). (1) A Jewish priest and teacher of Ptolemy, the king to whom Judas Maccabee sent letters (2 Macc. 1:10). He is sometimes identified with Aristobulus the Peripatetic philosopher, tutor of Ptolemy VI Philometer (180–146 b.c.) and head
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ARISTOBULUS, OT PSEUDEPIGRAPHA
ARISTOBULUS, OT PSEUDEPIGRAPHA air´is-tob´yuh-luhs, soo´duh-pig´ruh-fuh [Ἀριστόβουλος Aristoboulos]. Fragments attributed to the Jewish-Hellenistic philosopher and exegete Aristobulus. There are five main fragments, all evidently derived from one lengthy exegetical work on the Torah (Explanations of