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Ariel (Moabite)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Possibly the father of two men who were killed by Benaiah, one of David’s mighty men (2 Sam 23:20; 1 Chr 11:22). The meaning of ariel in these passages is uncertain. Some Bible translations treat it as a proper name, identifying Benaiah’s victims as “sons of Ariel” (e.g., LEB, NASB, NRSV). Others translate the phrase as a description, such as “mightiest warriors” (NIV) and “lion-like heroes” (NKJV).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ariel the Moabite
Ariel the Moabite (אֲרִיאֵל‎, ari'el). Possibly the father of two men who were killed by Benaiah, one of David’s mighty men (2 Sam 23:20; 1 Chr 11:22). The meaning of ariel in these passages is uncertain. Some Bible translations treat it as a proper name, identifying Benaiah’s victims as “sons of Ariel” (e.g.,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ariel (Person)
ARIEL (PERSON) [Heb ʾărı̂ʾēl (אֲרִיאֵל)]. Var. IDUEL. Even though the Hebrew terms that stand behind the transliteration “ariel” occur rarely in the Bible, “ariel” seems to carry a wide range of meanings: (1) a poetic name for Jerusalem (Isa 29:1–2, 7); (2) a common noun for “heroes” or “champions” (2
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ariel (Person)
Ariel (Person). 1. Person or thing overcome in a heroic deed by Benaiah, chief of David’s bodyguard (2 Sm 23:20; 1 Chr 11:22). It is not clear that the Hebrew word ariel is a proper name in these passages. Benaiah may have killed two “lionlike men” of Moab (kjv) or destroyed two Moabite altar hearths.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ariel (Moabite)
3. TWO ARIELS [Heb. šnê’ari’ēl] (2 S. 23:20; 1 Ch. 11:22); AV “two lionlike men”; NEB “two champions.” Moabites who were slain by David’s warrior Benaiah. The LXX has dýo hyioí ariel. The meaning of the term is not clear.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ariel (Person)
ARIEL (Person)1. Person or thing overcome in a heroic deed by Benaiah, chief of David’s bodyguard (2 Sm 23:20; 1 Chr 11:22). It is not clear that the Hebrew word ariel is a proper name in these passages. Benaiah may have killed two “lionlike men” of Moab (kjv) or destroyed two Moabite altar hearths.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ariel
Ariel (air´ee-uhl; Heb., “altar hearth” or “heroes”).1 One of the leading men summoned by Ezra and sent by him to secure ministers for the temple (Ezra 8:16).2 According to the nrsv, a Moabite man in 2 Sam. 23:20 (1 Chron. 11:22) whose two sons were slain by David’s champion warrior Benaiah. Some English
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ariel
ARIEL1. The hearth of the altar of burnt offering in Ezekiel’s temple (Ezk 43:15–16). See Hearth.2. A leader whom Ezra sent to Casiphia, presumably a Babylonian Levitical settlement, to seek ministers for the temple (Ezr 8:16–17).3. A symbolic name for Jerusalem (Isa 29:1–2, 7). Its usage favors the
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ariel
ARIEL (Heb. ’arî’ēl, ‘hearth of El [God]’). 1. A name for the altar of burnt-offering described by Ezekiel (43:15–16). Several interpretations of this name have been given; ‘altar-hearth’ (rv); ‘mount of God’ (cf. Ezk. 43:15–16) or, less likely, ‘Lion of God’. In this sense ’r’l is named on the *Moabite
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ariel (Person)
Ariel (Heb. ʾărɩ̂ʾel) (PERSON)1. A member of the delegation sent by Ezra the scribe to obtain ministers for the temple (Ezra 8:16; cf. 1 Esdr. 8:43, “Iduel”).2, 3. Two Moabites (RSV “two ariels of Moab”; NJB “two formidable Moabites”) killed by Benaiah, one of David’s champions (NRSV 2 Sam. 23:20
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ariel
ARIEL (Hebrew, “lion of God,” also “heroes” or “champions”)1. One of the men handpicked by Ezra to recruit twelve Levites to serve as ministers for the house of God when the Jews returned to Israel from exile in Babylon (Ezra 8:16).2. The name Ezekiel gives to the “altar hearth” in the Temple of Jerusalem
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Ariel
A´riel (lion of God).1. One of the “chief men” who under Ezra directed the caravan which he led back from Babylon to Jerusalem. Ezra 8:16. (b.c. 459.) The word occurs also in reference to two Moabites slain by Benaiah. 2 Sam. 23:20; 1 Chron. 11:22. Many regard the word as an epithet, “lion-like”; but
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