Loading…
Ariel (Jerusalem)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A poetic name for Jerusalem used in Isa 29:1–2, 7.The term seems to be derived from Hebrew אֲרִי‎ (ariy) “lion” and אֵל‎ (el) “god,” literally meaning “lion of God.” This interpretation is supported by 2 Sam 23:20, where it refers to a warrior or champion (i.e., a lion-like man). Its use as a proper name in Ezra 8:16 also supports this sense.It may also mean “altar hearth,” as in Ezek 43:15–16; Mesha Stele, line 12. Zion is characterized as a place of burning in 30:13 and 31:9. The book of Isaiah often refers to judgment by fire—supporting the translation “altar hearth.”
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ariel
Ariel (אֲרִיאֵל‎, ari'el). A poetic name for Jerusalem used in Isa 29:1–2, 7.The term seems to be derived from Hebrew אֲרִי‎ (ariy) “lion” and אֵל‎ (el) “god,” literally meaning “lion of God.” This interpretation is supported by 2 Sam 23:20, where it refers to a warrior or champion (i.e., a lion-like man).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ariel (Place)
ARIEL (PLACE) [Heb ʾarı̂ʾēl (אַרִיאֵל)]. When used to refer to a place, Ariel is a descriptive term applied to the city of Jerusalem: “Ho Ariel, Ariel, the city where David encamped”; “Yet I will distress Ariel …”; “And the multitudes of all the nations that fight against Ariel …” (Isa 29:1, 2, 7).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ariel (Place)
Ariel (Place). Poetic designation for Jerusalem, used by the prophet Isaiah in a “woe” oracle warning people to turn from their wrongdoing (Is 29:1, 2, 7). Jerusalem, location of the altar of burnt offering, was called Ariel (“hearth of God”) by synecdoche, a poetic device in which a whole thing is referred
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ariel (Place)
2. A cryptic name for Jerusalem (Isa. 29:1f, 7) as the principal stronghold of divine worship.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ariel (Place)
ARIEL (Place) Poetic designation for Jerusalem, used by the prophet Isaiah in a “woe” oracle warning people to turn from their wrongdoing (Is 29:1–2, 7). Jerusalem, location of the altar of burnt offering, was called Ariel (“hearth of God”) by synecdoche, a poetic device in which a whole thing is referred
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ariel
Ariel (air´ee-uhl; Heb., “altar hearth” or “heroes”).1 One of the leading men summoned by Ezra and sent by him to secure ministers for the temple (Ezra 8:16).2 According to the nrsv, a Moabite man in 2 Sam. 23:20 (1 Chron. 11:22) whose two sons were slain by David’s champion warrior Benaiah. Some English
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ariel
ARIEL1. The hearth of the altar of burnt offering in Ezekiel’s temple (Ezk 43:15–16). See Hearth.2. A leader whom Ezra sent to Casiphia, presumably a Babylonian Levitical settlement, to seek ministers for the temple (Ezr 8:16–17).3. A symbolic name for Jerusalem (Isa 29:1–2, 7). Its usage favors the
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ariel
ARIEL (Heb. ’arî’ēl, ‘hearth of El [God]’). 1. A name for the altar of burnt-offering described by Ezekiel (43:15–16). Several interpretations of this name have been given; ‘altar-hearth’ (rv); ‘mount of God’ (cf. Ezk. 43:15–16) or, less likely, ‘Lion of God’. In this sense ’r’l is named on the *Moabite
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ariel (Place)
Ariel (Heb. ʾărɩ̂ʾel) (PLACE)A cryptic name designating Jerusalem (Isa. 29:1–2, 7) in an oracle concerning both the siege and preservation of the city. The Hebrew term may here designate the hearth of an altar (cf. 1QIsaa; Ezek. 43:15–16).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ariel (Place)
ARIEL [ârˊĭ əl] (Heb. ˒arî˒el “lion of God” [?]) (PLACE). A cryptic name designating Jerusalem (Isa. 29:1–2, 7) in an oracle concerning both the siege and preservation of the city. The Hebrew term may here designate the hearth of an altar (1 QIsaa reads Heb. ˒arû˒el “altar hearth”; cf. Ezek.
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Ariel
ARIEL אריאל‎/אראלI. The term Ariel occurs 16 times in different spellings in the OT and once in the Moabite Mesha-inscription (KAI 181:12, the suggested second occurrence in line 17 is doubtful). The meaning of the word is disputed among scholars. Regarding its etymology, several propositions have been
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Ariel
Ariel. A name used of *Jerusalem in Is. 29:1. The most probable interpretation appears to be ‘altar-hearth’ (cf. Ezek. 43:15 f.).S. Feigin, ‘The Meaning of Ariel’, Journal of Biblical Literature, 39 (1920), pp. 131–7; W. F. Albright, ‘The Babylonian Temple-Tower and the Altar of Burnt Offering’, ibid.,
See also
Topics & Themes
Related