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Aretas I
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The first known Nabataean king; mentioned in 2 Maccabees 5:8, a deuterocanonical book focusing on the Jewish revolt against Greek king Antiochus IV Epiphanes. Aretas’ name appears on a carving from 168 bc in Halutza, a Negev city that once was part of the Nabataean Incense Route. Aretas was succeeded by King Rabel I, whose reign, beginning about 140 bc, is noted on a Petran statue.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Aretas I
Aretas I The first known Nabataean king; mentioned in 2 Maccabees 5:8, a deuterocanonical book focusing on the Jewish revolt against Greek king Antiochus IV Epiphanes. Aretas’ name appears on a carving from 168 bc in Halutza, a Negev city that once was part of the Nabataean Incense Route. Aretas was
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Aretas
ARETAS. Dynastic name of at least four kings of the royal house of Nabatea located at Petra. The earliest Nabatean Aramaic inscription from Elusa on the Petra-Gaza road in the Negev mentions an “Aretas, King of the Nabateans.” Proposals for a date of the inscription vary from the beginning to the end
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Aretas
Aretas. Name of several kings of an Arabian people called the Nabataeans, considered to be descendants of Nebaioth, Ishmael’s oldest son (Gn 25:12–16; 1 Chr 1:29). According to the Jewish historian Josephus, Ishmael’s descendants inhabited an area all the way from the Euphrates to the Red Sea, calling
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Aretas
Aretas arʹə-təs [GK. Haretas—‘virtuous, pleasing’ < ḥâriṭat, found on Nabatean inscriptions]. A common name among Arabian rulers, mentioned in the Apocrypha, in the NT, and in Josephus.
Aretas (Arabian king)
1. An Arabian king who accused (GK. and NEB “imprisoned”) Jason, causing him to become a fugitive (2 Macc. 5:8). He was a contemporary of Antiochus Epiphanes (ca 170 b.c.).
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Aretas
ARETAS1. Name of several kings of an Arabian people called the Nabateans, considered to be descendants of Nebaioth, Ishmael’s oldest son (Gn 25:12–16; 1 Chr 1:29). According to the Jewish historian Josephus, Ishmael’s descendants inhabited an area all the way from the Euphrates to the Red Sea, calling
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Aretas
ARETAS. Mentioned only in 2 Cor 11:32 in the NT. The name was used by the kings of Nabatean Arabia whose capital was Petra. This was Aretas IV (9 b.c.a.d. 40), whose daughter was married to Herod Antipas (q.v.) until the latter divorced her to marry Herodias. As a result of Herod’s act, along with border
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Aretas
ARETAS. The reference in 2 Cor. 11:32 is to Aretas IV Philopatris, the last and most famous *Nabataean king of that name (c. 9 bc–ad 40). He was confirmed in the tenure of his client kingdom by Augustus, albeit somewhat reluctantly, for he had seized it without permission. His daughter married *Herod
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Aretas
Aretas (Gk. Harétas)1. Aretas I, the first Nabatean ruler named in ancient literature. According to 2 Macc. 5:8 the Jewish high priest Jason somehow ran afoul of Aretas when he fled from Jerusalem to Nabatea in 168 b.c.e. Here, Aretas is called týrannos, which may indicate that the Nabatean rulers
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Aretas
Aretas [ărˊə təs] (Gk. Haretas; Nabatean Ḥâriṭat “virtuous, pleasing”).† The name of several Nabatean rulers.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Aretas
ARETAS The name of four kings of Nabatea, two of which are mentioned in the Bible.1. Aretas I (second century b.c.) was mentioned in 2 Maccabees (5:8) in relation to the flight of the high priest Jason in 168 b.c. Aretas expelled Jason, who then went to Egypt.2. Aretas IV (r. 9 b.c.–a.d. 39) enjoyed
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Aretas
Are´tas, or Ar´etas (graver).1. A contemporary of Antiochus Epiphanes, b.c. 170, and Jason. 2 Macc. 5:8.2. The Aretas alluded to by St. Paul, 2 Cor. 11:32, was father-in-law of Herod Antipas.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Aretas
AR´ETAS (arʹî-tas). A name common to many of the kings of Arabia Petrea; the fourth king of that name was the father-in-law of Herod Antipas (which see). Herod afterward married the wife of his brother Philip, and in consequence of this the daughter of Aretas returned to her father. Enraged at the conduct
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