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Arch
Archway • Entrance Room
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Arch
Arch. Curved structure, usually of masonry, supporting the weight over a doorway or other open space. The capstone or keystone is the most important part of an arch and the last stone put in place. It ties the two curving sides together and distributes the weight evenly through them to the foundation.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Arch
ARCH* Curved structure, usually of masonry, supporting the weight over a doorway or other open space. The capstone or keystone is the most important part of an arch and the last stone put in place. It ties the two curving sides together and distributes the weight evenly through them to the foundation.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Arch
ARCH. The English word “arch” occurs 15 times in the KJV and only in the plural (Ezk 40:16–36). It is the translation of two similar forms of the Heb. word ˒êlām, which is related to Heb ˒ûlām, “porch,” “vestibule.” The words thus mean generally “porch,” differing slightly in emphasis. They designate
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Arch
Archan architectural term found only in Ezek. 40:16, 21, 22, 26, 29. There is no absolute proof that the Israelites employed arches in their buildings. The arch was employed in the building of the pyramids of Egypt. The oldest existing arch is at Thebes, and bears the date B.C. 1350. There are also
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Archway
ARCHWAY — a roofed and partially enclosed section in the Temple in Jerusalem that was described by the prophet Ezekiel in his vision (Ezek. 40:16–36; portico, NIV). Other words used to describe this part of the Temple are arch (1 Kin. 6:3, KJV) and vestibule (1 Chr. 28:11, NKJV). Also see Architecture.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ARCH
ARCH<arch> ( אַיִל‎ [’ayil]; Septuagint [τὰ αἰλάμ, ta ailam], in sense of “posts” or “colonnade”): Referred to repeatedly in Ezekiel 40:16 ff, but translation is an error for “porch” or “portico.” the Revised Version (British and American) gives in marg, “or, colonnade. The meaning of the
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Arch
ARCH KJV rendering of a Hebrew word in Ezek. 40:16–36. The KJV translates the word as “porch” elsewhere (e.g., 1 Kings 6:3; 7:12, 19, 21). Other versions translate the word as “porch” (NASB), “portico” and “galleries (NIV), “vestibule” and “walls” (RSV), and “entrance room” and “galleries” (TEV). Aside
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Arch
arch. Incorrect term used by KJV in Ezek. 40:16–36 with reference to the porches of the temple gates. See porch.
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Arch of Galerius
Arch of Galerius(Thessaloniki, Greece). Octopylon arch, supported on eight piers, dramatically situated at the intersection of two colonnaded streets, designed as part of the palace complex for Caesar Galerius Maximianus (see R. Hanslik, KlPauly, s.v.). The triple arches crossed the Via Egnatia on the
Tetrapylon
TetrapylonThe four-way (or four-sided) arch (the widespread term [arcus] quadrifons for this building type has no ancient testimonies) is a relatively rare version of the Roman honorific arch. More than 50 examples (dating from the Augustan principate to the 6th c.) are attested in archaeology and epigraphy;
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Arch
ARCH, ärch (אַיִל‎, ’ayil; LXX τὰ αἰλάμ, tá ailám, in sense of “posts” or “colonnade”): Referred to repeatedly in Ezk 40:16 ff, but tr is an error for “porch” or “portico.” RV gives in marg, “or, colonnade. The meaning of the Heb word is uncertain.” The principle of arch construction was known to the
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