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Aratus
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Aratus
Aratus (Ἄρατος, Aratos). A Greek poet (315/310–240 bc) who wrote a work titled Phaenomena, the fifth line of which Paul quotes in Acts 17:28.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Aratus (Person)
ARATUS (PERSON). A Stoic poet of Soli in Cilicia (315–240 b.c.e.). A portion of the opening invocation to Zeus from his astronomical poem Phaenomena is quoted in the speech of Paul at the Areopagus (Acts 17:28): “For we are indeed his [God’s] offspring.” Phaenomena, Aratus’ only completely extant poem,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Aratus
Aratus arʹə-təs [GK. Aretos]. A Stoic poet of Soli in Cilicia who died about 240 b.c. He wrote and taught under the patronage of Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedonia, and Antiochus I of Syria. His most famous work—the only one extant in a complete form—is Phaenomena, a didactic poem about astronomy.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Aratus
ARATUS* Greek poet (315?–245? bc). Born at Soli in Cilicia (region in Asia Minor), Aratus studied in Athens where he was influenced by Zeno, the father of Stoicism. Later, Aratus lived in the palace of Antigonus Gonatas of Macedonia and Antiochus I, king of Syria. Aratus’s only existing work is a poem
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Aratus
Aratus (air´uh-tuhs), a Stoic poet of the mid-third century bce whose work Phainomena is quoted in Paul’s Areopagus speech (Acts 17:28: “for we are indeed his offspring”). See also Areopagus; Stoicism.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Aratus
Aratus (Gk. Arétos)A 3rd-century b.c.e. Stoic poet from Soli in Cilicia. In his speech on the Areopagus Paul quotes from Aratus’ poem Phaenomena (Acts 17:28).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Aratus
Aratus [ărˊə təs] (Gk. Aretos). A third-century B.C. Stoic poet from Soli in Cilicia. In his speech on the Areopagus Paul quotes from his poem Phaenomena (Acts 17:28).
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Aratus
ARATUS A Greek poet (ca. 315–240 b.c.) from Soli in Cilicia, author of an astronomical poem, Phaenomena. Paul quoted from the work in his preaching on the Areopagus of Athens (Acts 17:28).
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Aratus
AratusAratus (ahʹruh-tuhs), a Stoic poet of the mid-third century b.c. whose work Phainomena is quoted in Paul’s Areopagus speech (Acts 17:28: ‘for we are indeed his offspring’). See also Areopagus; Stoics.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Aratus
Aratus air′uh-tuhs (Ἄρατος, “prayed for”). A Greek poet. Born about 315 b.c. at Soli (Soloi) in Cilicia, Aratus studied at Athens and was a friend of Zeno, the founder of Stoicism (see Greek religion and philosophy II.A.; Stoics). Of his many poems, the only one extant is the Phaenomena, a treatise
All the People in the Bible: An A–Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture
Aratus
Aratus [ar-uh-tus]: a third-century bce Stoic poet quoted by Paul when he spoke on the Areopagus (Acts 17:28)
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ARATUS
ARATUS [Ἄρατος Aratos]. A Stoic poet (315–240 bce) from Soli in Cilicia, educated in ATHENS. His astronomical poem Phaenomena was widely read and translated into Arabic and Latin. Its proem to Zeus is quoted by Paul in the AREOPAGUS speech, “For we too are his offspring” (Acts 17:28).
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