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Approve
Allow • Allowance • Approval • Endorsement • Experiment
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Approve
Approve Biblical and archaic usages of the word often intend a stronger meaning than the ordinary “have a favorable opinion of,” especially in the NT. As a translation of GK. dokimázo, dókimos (“approved”), it implies a testing or proving. The RSV often uses a stronger or more specific word, such
Allow
Allow In the AV the word has the sense “consent to” in Lk. 11:48 (GK. syneudokéō), “accept” or “admit” in Acts 24:15 (prosdéchomai), “understand” in Rom. 7:15 (ginó̄skō), and “approve” in Rom. 14:22; 1 Thess. 2:4 (dokimázō).
Experiment
Experiment The AV uses this word in the phrase “the experiment of this ministration” (2 Cor. 9:13; cf. RSV “the test of this service”). The Greek term dokimé̄ denotes “approvedness” or “tried character”; thus, the apostle is saying that the liberal contribution was proof of the sincerity of the Corinthian
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Approve
APPROVE. The Gr. verb dokimazō and its derivatives are used particularly of testing and purifying metals, and hence metaphorically of the testing of the Christian in such passages as (1 Pet 1:7): “That the proof [dokimon] of your faith, being more precious than gold which is perishable, even though
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
APPROVE
APPROVE<a-proov’>: This word, as ordinarily used, means “to entertain a favorable opinion concerning” (Psalm 49:13; Lamentations 3:36). Its Biblical and archaic use conveys a much stronger meaning and is equivalent to its use in legal formalities of today, “to approve a bill,” i.e. by some act,
ALLOW; ALLOWANCE
ALLOW; ALLOWANCE<a-lou’>, <a-lou’-ans>: The verb “to allow” is used in the King James Version to translate four different Greek words:1. suneudokeo, “to approve together” (with others) (the Revised Version (British and American) “consent unto”), Luke 11:48.2. prosdechomai, “to receive to
EXPERIMENT
EXPERIMENT<eks-per’-i-ment> ([δοκιμή, dokime], “approvedness,” “tried character”): “The experiment of this ministration” (2 Corinthians 9:13 the King James Version, the Revised Version (British and American) “the proving of you by his ministration”), i.e. the sincerity of their Christian
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Experimentation
experimentation. As the method of inquiry of empirical science, the act or process of examining empirical data and testing hypotheses in order to come to a specific conclusion or result. Experimentation becomes a topic for ethical reflection when the objects of inquiry are living beings (especially humans
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Approve
APPROVE, a-prōōvʹ: This word, as ordinarily used, means “to entertain a favorable opinion concerning” (Ps 49:13; Lam 3:36). Its Biblical and archaic use conveys a much stronger meaning and is equivalent to its use in legal formalities of today, “to approve a bill,” i.e. by some act, generally a signature,
Allow, Allowance
ALLOW, a-louʹ, ALLOWANCE, a-louʹans: The vb. “to allow” is used in AV to tr four different Gr words: (1) suneudokéō, “to approve together” (with others) (RV “consent unto”), Lk 11:48. (2) prosdéchomai, “to receive to oneself,” “admit” (RV “look for,” m “accept”); Acts 24:15. (3) ginō̇skō, “to know,”
Experiment
EXPERIMENT, eks-perʹi-ment (δοκιμή, dokimḗ, “approvedness,” “tried character”): “The experiment of this ministration” (2 Cor 9:13 AV, RV “the proving of you by his ministration”), i.e. the sincerity of their Christian profession was evidenced by their liberal contribution.