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Apocrypha
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A collection of books included in the Old Testament of ancient Christian Bibles in Greek or Latin but not included in the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible. Their canonical status in different Christian groups varies. The Old Testament Apocrypha were composed primarily during the period between the undisputed Old Testament books and the New Testament (ca. third century bc into the first century ad).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha, Old Testament
Apocrypha, Old Testament (ἀπόκρυφος, apokryphos). A collection of books included in the Old Testament of ancient Christian Bibles in Greek or Latin but not included in the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible. Their canonical status in different Christian groups varies. The Old Testament Apocrypha were
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha
APOCRYPHA. The Greek noun apokrypha (ἀποκρυφα) means “hidden.” It is used to denote writings on the fringes of the canon of the OT and NT. See also the CANON articles.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha
APOCRYPHA* Books excluded from the canon of Scripture.PreviewIntroductionApocryphal GospelsApocryphal ActsApocryphal EpistlesApocalyptic ApocryphaSpecific Titles of Apocryphal WritingsIntroduction The writings of the Old and New Testaments tended to attract certain additional compositions
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Apocrypha / Deuterocanonical Literature
Apocrypha (uh-pok´ruh-fuh) / deuterocanonical (dyoo´tuh-roh-kuh-non´i-kuhl) literature, those books or parts of books of the Christian ot that are found in the Greek lxx translation of the Hebrew Bible, but not in the Hebrew Bible itself. Their status as scripture is disputed and even the choice of terminology
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Apocrypha
APOCRYPHA. Commonly used to designate a collection of edifying books not included in the canon of Scripture.TerminologyApocrypha as a Gr. adjective, neuter plural, meaning “hidden things,” is to be found in Dan 2:22 (Theodotian); Sir 14:21; 39:3, 7; 42:19; 43:32; 48:25; and in the NT in three passages
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Apocrypha
ApocryphaThe term “Apocrypha,” from the Greek for “hidden” or “obscure” (apó + krýptein, “to hide away”), refers to a collection of 15 books deemed canonical by Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox but not by Jews or Protestants. The reason Jerome (d. 420) and Cyril of Jerusalem (d. 386) first applied
Deuterocanonical Books
Deuterocanonical BooksAn alternate name (“second canon”) which the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches apply to those books found in the LXX and Vulgate but not in the Hebrew text of the OT. According to the decision of the Council of Trent (1548) and the First Vatican Council (1870) these books, like
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha
Apocrypha [ə pŏkˊrə fə] (Gk. apókryphos “hidden, concealed”). Those writings included in the LXX and Vulgate but not in the Hebrew (MT) or Protestant canon. With minor exceptions, the apocryphal works are 1 Esdras, 2 Esdras (Vulg. 4 Ezra), Tobit, Judith, Additions to the Book of Esther, the
Deuterocanonical Books
Deuterocanonical Books. An alternate name (“second canon”) which the Roman Catholic church applies to those books found in the LXX and Vulgate but not in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. According to the decision of the Council of Trent (1548) and the First Vatican Council (1870) these books,
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Apocryphal Books
APOCRYPHAL BOOKS (Greek apokrypha, “hidden things”) The name used for various Jewish and Christian writings that are often similar to the inspired works in the Bible, but that were judged by the Church not to possess canonical authority.Catholics and Protestants disagree over the precise use of the
Deuterocanonical
DEUTEROCANONICAL Those books (and parts of books) of the Old Testament whose inclusion in the Catholic canon was disputed at one time: Judith, Tobit, Sirach, Wisdom, 1 and 2 Maccabees, and Baruch; also Dan 3:24–90 and chapters 13 and 14 and Esth 10:4–16 and chapter 24. The term “deuterocanonical” (from
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal WritingsThis article covers extracanonical Christian literature that is either attributed to biblical persons as authors or recounts narratives about biblical persons that parallel or supplement the biblical narratives. In most early Christian literature of this kind the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Apocrypha, the
Apocrypha, the (Gk. τὰ ἀπόκρυφα (plur.), ‘the hidden [things]’). The biblical Books received by the early Church as part of the Gk. version of the OT, but not included in the Heb. Bible, being excluded by the non-Hellenistic Jews from their *canon. Their position in Christian usage has been somewhat
Deuterocanonical Books, the
Deuterocanonical Books, the. An alternative name for the Books contained in the Greek (*Septuagint) version of the OT, but not in the Hebrew. They are more commonly known as the *Apocrypha.