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Apocalypse of Thomas
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical book from the second—fourth century that mentions Thomas the apostle and concerns the signs of the end of the world. The Apocalypse of Thomas work was never widely authoritative during the early church period. The sixth-century ad Gelasian Decree condemns a “Revelation of Thomas,” which may be a reference to the same work.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Thomas, Apocalypse of
Apocalypse of Thomas (Ἀποκάλυψις Θωμᾶς, Apokalypsis Thōmas). A noncanonical book from the second—fourth century that mentions Thomas the apostle and concerns the signs of the end of the world. The Apocalypse of Thomas work was never widely authoritative during the early church period. The sixth-century
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Thomas, Apocalypse of
THOMAS, APOCALYPSE OF. A 5th-century apocryphal apocalypse that describes the events that are to occur before the end of the world. It is unlike other apocalypses, such as those of Peter and Paul, which provide visions of a future world. The Apocalypse of Thomas was known only through a reference in
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Thomas, Apocalypse of
Thomas, Apocalypse of. An apocryphal eschatological treatise, probably written by a *Manichaean at the end of the 4th cent. and referred to in the *Gelasian Decree. It had long been lost, but two recensions, both in Latin, were rediscovered in a number of MSS early in the 20th cent. The shorter,
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Thomas, Apocalypse of (Writing)
Thomas, Apocalypse of. Long known only from its condemnation in the 6th-cent. Decretum Gelasianum, this Apocalypse is a comparatively recent discovery, first identified in 1908 and now extant in two versions. The longer one, contained in a Munich ms and in fragments in Rome and Verona, falls into two
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
THOMAS, APOCALYPSE OF
THOMAS, APOCALYPSE OF. Written in the 4th cent. ce, the apocryphal Apocalypse of Thomas survives in both a longer version and a shorter, older version. It draws on the NT book of Revelation and postbiblical apocalypses for much of its imagery. “Thomas” receives from the Son of God the details about the