Loading…
Apocalypse of Paul
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Also known as the gnostic Revelation of Paul. Not to be confused with a different text called by the same name. The gnostic, pseudonymous Apocalypse of Paul is a noncanonical text discovered in 1945 in Nag Hammadi, Egypt. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Apocalypse of Paul, Gnostic
Apocalypse of Paul, Gnostic Also known as the gnostic Revelation of Paul. Not to be confused with a different text called by the same name. The gnostic, pseudonymous Apocalypse of Paul is a noncanonical text discovered in 1945 in Nag Hammadi, Egypt. This work was never widely authoritative in the early
Paul, Apocalypse of
Apocalypse of Paul (Visio Pauli). A noncanonical work that claims to contain the Apostle Paul’s firsthand account of his journey into the afterlife. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period and was deemed to contain fables by church father Augustine (Tractates on the Gospel
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Paul, Apocalypse of
PAUL, APOCALYPSE OF. The name of two different apocryphal works, both inspired by the tradition of Paul’s “rapture” into the heavens (2 Cor 12:2–4). One, an extensive tour of paradise and hell, composed sometime in the 4th or 5th century c.e. is preserved in a long Latin version; a Greek abridgment,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Paul, Apocalypse Of
Paul, Apocalypse of (V, 2)A pseudonymous apocalypse, especially popular among early Christians. The Apocalypse of Paul elaborates upon 2 Cor. 12:2–4, Paul’s account of a man (probably himself) who had journeyed to the third heaven. The narrative, originally composed in Greek but existing in several
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Paul, Apocalypse of (Writing)
Paul, Apocalypse of. †A title apparently given to several apocryphal accounts of Paul’s experience when he was “caught up to the third heaven” (2 Cor. 12:2–4). Two such works survive. One, preserved in full in Latin only, relates Paul’s tour of paradise and hell, and was probably written in the late
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Paul, Apocalypse of St
Paul, Apocalypse of St. An apocryphal apocalypse, written in Greek and dating from the latter half of the 4th cent., which describes in detail what St *Paul saw when he was taken up into the ‘third heaven’ (2 Cor. 12:2). It narrates that St Paul was led into paradise, where in the city of God he
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 4, M–P
Paul, Apocalypse of (Writing)
Paul, Apocalypse of. The title given to two distinct apocryphal works. Paul wrote of being caught up into paradise in the third heaven, and hearing “things that man is not permitted to tell” (2 Cor. 12:1–4). Such passages offered a clear opportunity for the writing of apocrypha, in this case to narrate
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
PAUL, APOCALYPSE OF
PAUL, APOCALYPSE OF. Paul’s reference to his visionary ascent through the heavens (2 Cor 12:1–5) was the basis for two independent “Apocalypse of Paul” traditions. One apocryphal apocalypse is alleged to have been discovered in the foundations of Paul’s house at Tarsus ca. 388 ce when an angel commanded