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Antipatris
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Antipatris
Antipatris (‘Αντιπατρίς, Antipatris). City built by Herod the Great that provided a stopping point for Paul and his military escort on the way from Jerusalem to Caesarea (Acts 23:31). Antipatris was named by King Herod the Great for his father, Antipater (Josephus, Antiquities 16.143; Jewish War 1.417).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Antipatris (Place)
ANTIPATRIS (PLACE) [Gk antipatris (ἀντιπατρις)]. The city to which Paul was taken on his way from Jerusalem to Caesarea (Acts 23:31). Also, at Matt 13:54 Codex Sinaiticus originally had Jesus “coming to Antipatris,” but the anti- was subsequently crossed out so that it read (correctly) “home country” (Gk
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Antipatris
Antipatris. City some 26 miles south of Caesarea rebuilt by Herod the Great in 9 bc in honor of his father, Antipater. Before its rebuilding, it was known as Aphek. Paul passed through Antipatris under Roman guard on his way from Jerusalem to Caesarea (Acts 23:31). Antipatris served as a Roman military
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Antipatris
Antipatris an-tipʹə-tris [GK. Antipatris]. A town mentioned in Acts. 23:31 as the end of the first stage of Paul’s transfer, under a guard of 470 Roman soldiers, from Jerusalem to Caesarea. The site is located near Râs el-‘Ain at the headwaters of the Yarkon, about 16 km (10 mi) north of Lydda (Lud),
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Antipatris
ANTIPATRIS City some 26 miles (41.8 kilometers) south of Caesarea rebuilt by Herod the Great in 9 bc in honor of his father, Antipater. Before its rebuilding, it was known as Aphek. Paul passed through Antipatris under Roman guard on his way from Jerusalem to Caesarea (Acts 23:31). Antipatris served
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Antipatris
Antipatris (an-tip´uh-tris), a town on the coastal plain along the principal international highway of the Levant, the Via Maris, guarding the pass between the mountains to the east and the Yarkon River to the west. The site has been identified with Aphek (Josh. 12:18; 1 Sam 4:1; 29:1), where the Philistines
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Antipatris
ANTIPATRIS. This city is mentioned only once in the NT (Acts 23:31). Paul and the 470 Roman soldiers guarding him stopped there when he was being transferred by night from Jerusalem to Caesarea. The site overlooks the plain of Sharon, c. 30 miles NW of Jerusalem and 28 miles S of Caesarea. The town was
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Antipatris
ANTIPATRIS. Formerly Kaphar-Saba, the modern Ras el-Ain, this city, about 42 km S of Caesarea on the road to Lydda, was rebuilt by Herod the Great in memory of his father Antipater (Josephus, Ant. 16.143; BJ 1.417). Paul was taken there on his way from Jerusalem to Caesarea (Acts 23:31). Vespasian occupied
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Antipatris
Antipatris (Gk. Antipatrɩ́s)The city rebuilt by Herod the Great in 9 b.c.e. on the site of Aphek (1), renamed after his father Antipater. Located at modern Râs el-ʿAin/Tel Afeq (143168) on the coastal plain, it was perhaps a control point and way station between Caesarea Maritima and Jerusalem. Antipatris
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Antipatris
Antipatris [ăn tĭpˊə trĭs] (Gk. Antipatris). A city founded in 9 B.C. upon the ruins of Old Testament Aphek (1) by Herod the Great, who named it after his father, Antipater. It was here that Paul spent the night, in the custody of Roman soldiers, en route from Jerusalem to Caesarea where he was
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Aphek; Antipatris
APHEK; ANTIPATRIS a) An important station on the ancient Via Maris (Roads), mentioned in the list of Pharaoh Tuthmosis III. The King of Aphek was one of the 31 rulers of Canaan vanquished by Joshua (Josh. 12:18). The Philistines gathered their armies there to go into battle against Israel (1 Sam. 4:1;
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Antipatris
Antipa´tris, or Antip´atris (for this father), a town to which the soldiers conveyed St. Paul by night on their march, Acts 23:31. Its ancient name was Capharsaba; and Herod, when he rebuilt the city, changed it to Antipatris, in honor of his father, Antipater. The village Kefr-Saba still retains the
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