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Antiochus III the Great
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Antiochus III the Great
Antiochus III the Great (Ἀντίοχος Μέγας, Antiochos Megas). The sixth Seleucid ruler of the Hellenistic Syrian Empire from 223–187 bc. Several of the events described in Dan 11 are thought to correspond to the actions of Antiochus III.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Antiochus (Person)
ANTIOCHUS (PERSON). A Macedonian name (“opposer”) borne by the father of Seleucus I, founder of the Seleucid dynasty of Syria, hence favored by the following kings of the dynasty.1. Antiochus I Soter (“savior”) (281–261 b.c.). Born 324 b.c., the son of Seleucus I and the Bactrian princess Apama, he
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Antiochus III The Great
Antiochus III The Great [GK. Megas—‘The Great’]. Born 242 b.c., Seleucid king of Syria 223–187 b.c., second son of Seleucus II Callinicus (246–226 b.c.); brother and successor of Seleucus III Soter (226–223 b.c.).After stabilizing the Seleucid Empire, Antiochus began the “Fourth Syrian War” by seeking
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Antiochus
Antiochus (Gk. Antɩ́ochos)The events described in 1-2 Maccabees and Daniel take place against the background of Seleucid history in the 2nd century b.c.e. The sequence of Seleucid rulers (with their approximate regnal years) is: Antiochus III (223–187), Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175), Antiochus IV
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ANTIOCHUS III
ANTIOCHUS III([Μέγας, Megas], “The Great,” mentioned in 1 Macc 1:10; 8:6-8): Son of Seleucus Kallinikos; succeeded to the throne of Syria in 222 BC; put to death his general, Hermeas, and then led an army against Egypt. Theodotus surrendered to him Tyre, Ptolemais and his naval fleet. Rhodes
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Antiochus
Antiochus.—The name of twelve kings of Syria, of whom several have connection with the Old Testament. Antiochus II. (261–246 b.c.)—He is supposed to be the king of the North whom Daniel mentions (11:6) as forming a marriage connection with the king of the South (Egypt). Antiochus III., the Great (224–187).
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
ANTIOCHUS III
ANTI′OCHUS III. (Ἀντίοχος), king of Syria, surnamed the Great (Μέγας), was the son of Seleucus Callinicus, and succeeded to the throne on the death of his brother Seleucus Ceraunus, b. c. 223, when he was only in his fifteenth year. His first cousin Achaeus, who might easily have assumed the royal
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Antiochus III
ANTIOCHUS III (Μέγας, Mégas, “The Great,” mentioned in 1 Macc 1:10; 8:6–8): Son of Seleucus Kallinikos; succeeded to the throne of Syria in 222 BC; put to death his general, Hermeas, and then led an army against Egypt. Theodotus surrendered to him Tyre, Ptolemais and his naval fleet. Rhodes and Cyzicus,
All the People in the Bible: An A–Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture
Antiochus III the Great (224�187 BCE) (?? ?e�?a?, �The Great�)
Antiochus III the Great (224–187 bce) (ὁ Μέγας, “the Great”)Antiochus III the Great was the younger son of Antiochus II. In 224 bce he succeeded his older brother Seleucus III, who reigned only two years.Antiochus III was only twenty years old when he became emperor, and he was strongly influenced
Antiochus
Antiochus [an--uh-kus] (1) the name of thirteen of the Seleucid (Syrian) emperors who played a major role in the transitional period from Old to New Testament times:– Antiochus I Soter (281–261 bce); not mentioned by name in the Bible– Antiochus II Theos (261–246 bce); probably the “King of the
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
3. Antiochus III (223–187 BCE)
3. Antiochus III (223–187 bce) the Great was the younger brother of Seleucus III became the new king, later known as Antiochus the Great. He set out to take Coele-Syria in what became known as the Fourth Syrian War (221–17 bce) against the new Egyptian king Ptolemy IV Euergetes. From 220–18 bce the Seleucid
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