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Animism
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Animism
Animism The belief that inanimate objects, plants, and animals all possess souls.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Animism
ANIMISM. This is the view that such things as trees, rocks, mountains, etc., are possessed of separate spirits which can either help and bless, or hinder and curse man. Such spirits are to be placated by certain acts and offerings. Animism differs from pantheism, which sees one spirit or god as present
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
animism
animism. The belief, widespread among primitive peoples, that certain material objects, e.g. trees and stones, are possessed by spirits which are the cause of their movements and characteristic qualities. Echoes of animism are found in the OT, e.g. *Jacob’s treatment of the stone at Bethel as if it
Compton’s Encyclopedia
animism
animismA religious belief that everything on Earth is imbued with a powerful spirit, capable of helping or harming human needs, is called animism. This faith in a universally shared life force was involved in the earliest forms of worship. The concept has survived in many societies, particularly among
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Animism
Animism. (Lat. anima, soul.)—By this word we designate the doctrine which admits the identity in man with the thinking soul and vital principle. The real animism has been taught in antiquity only by Aristotle. The Ionians and other philosophers before Plato, recognized, it is true, that the soul is the
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Animism
AnimismThe belief that inanimate objects possess a soul or spirit or that they are indwelt by spirits. Often the indwelling spirit is thought to be that of the departed, resulting in ancestor worship. Animistic religion is a religion of fear. Some New Age* advocates view animism as a way of deifying
New Dictionary of Theology: Historical and Systematic
Animism
ANIMISMA term introduced into the discussion about the origin and nature of religion by the anthropologist E. B. Tylor (1832–1917). He used it as a synonym for religion which he defined as ‘the belief in Spiritual Beings’. This belief arose when primitive humans, in attempting to explain phenomena such