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Anchor
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Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Anchor
Anchor. Object used to keep a ship or boat stationary in the water. An anchor is attached to a ship by a cable or chain, and when thrown overboard, its weight and/or ability to dig into the sea bottom keeps the vessel from drifting. Anchors were used many centuries before the time of Christ, beginning
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Anchor
Anchor [GK. ángkyra] (Acts 27:29f, 40; He. 6:19). Every ship carried several anchors, which at successive periods have been made of stone, iron, lead, and perhaps other metals. Each had two flukes and was held by a cable or chain. Stern-anchoring, described in Acts 27:29, was very unusual, but a necessity
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Anchor
ANCHOR Object used to keep a ship or boat stationary in the water. An anchor is attached to a ship by a cable or chain, and when thrown overboard, its weight and/or ability to dig into the sea bottom keeps the vessel from drifting. Anchors were used many centuries before the time of Christ, beginning
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Anchor
ANCHOR. Larger ships of NT times carried several anchors. In form, they have evolved from heavy stones (ANEP, fig. 42) to large wooden shanks with upturned flukes and wooden stocks or crossbars filled with lead, weighing hundreds of pounds (archaeology, XXI [1968], 63).Luke’s masterful account of Paul’s
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Anchor
Anchor (Gk. ángkyra). Whereas earlier anchors consisted merely of a heavy stone or stones, or wood, the anchor mentioned at Acts 27:29–30, 40 was made of iron and had two flukes. In Luke’s account of the rescue attempt at sea, the four anchors were lowered from the stern, which kept the ship carrying
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Anchor
ANCHOR One of the best-known symbols of Christian hope (Heb 6:19–20). Early Christians also used it as a cryptic version of the Cross.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Anchor
ANCHOR (Gk. ankura). Very naturally the anchor has been in use from the earliest times. In the heroic times of the Greeks large stones called eunai were used for anchors. The anchors used by the Romans were usually of iron and in shape resembled the modern anchor. The scriptural mention of the use of
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Anchor
AnchorFrom Acts 27:29, 30, 40, it would appear that the Roman vessels carried several anchors, which were attached to the stern as well as to the prow. The Roman anchor, like the modern one, had two teeth or flukes. In Heb. 6:19 the word is used metaphorically for that which supports or keeps one steadfast
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Anchor
ANCHOR — a heavy object on a ship cast overboard to hold the vessel in a particular place (Mark 6:53; Acts 27:29–30, 40). The writer of the Book of Hebrews had the holding power of an anchor in mind when he wrote, “This hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and steadfast” (Heb. 6:19). The
Compton’s Encyclopedia
anchor
anchorAn anchor is a device, usually of metal, that is attached to a ship or boat by a cable or chain. It is lowered to the seabed to hold the vessel in a particular place by means of a fluke or pointed projection that digs into the sea bottom.Stock anchor.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Anchor
Anchor.—This was a symbol of hope among the early Christians. St. Clement of Alexandria, says the anchor was one of the principal symbols which the first Christians engraved upon their rings. They considered it a sign of hope, of firmness in their faith, of a conscience always on the lookout, in order
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Anchor
Anʹchor, an instrument which, fastened in the bottom of the sea, holds a vessel firm during a storm. From the passage in Acts 27:29, 30 it appears that the vessels of Roman commerce carried each several anchors, some attached to the stern and others to the prow. The word anchor is used metaphorically