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An Officer
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A member of a government, religious, or military bureaucracy. Status or rank is apparent or can be implied or inferred, and such people have some measure of authority over the general population.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Officer
Officer A member of a government, religious, or military bureaucracy. Status or rank is apparent or can be implied or inferred, and such people have some measure of authority over the general population.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Apharsathchites, Apharsachites, Apharsites
Apharsathchites, Apharsachites, Apharsites. Words used in the Book of Ezra to designate certain groups of people in Samaria who joined in writing King Artaxerxes of Babylon to stop the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem. Apharsathchites (Ezr 4:9 kjv) could refer to a specific ethnic group or to government
Tarpelites
Tarpelites. kjv rendering of “officials” in Ezra 4:9. Its precise meaning is uncertain but possibly is a Persian title or an ethnic name.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Apharsachites
Apharsachites ə-färʹsə-kīts [Aram ap̱arseḵāyē’]. The AV translation of a word in Ezr. 5:6; 6:6 formerly taken to be a tribe living in Samaria, but now generally recognized to be officials (cf. RSV “governors”; NEB “inspectors”). The word has been connected with Old Persian frasaka and is found
Apharsites
Apharsites ə-färʹsīts [Aram ap̱ārsayē’]. The AV translation of a word in Ezr. 4:9 (cf. RSV “Persians”; NEB “chief officers”) formerly identified as another tribe (along with the Apharsathchites in the same verse) transplanted from the Trans-Euphrates province or from Persia by Asnapper (Ashurbanipal);
Officer
Officer [Heb ʾaddîr (Nah. 2:5 [MT 6]), ʿeḇeḏ (Jer. 46:26), neṣîḇ (1 K. 4:19), niṣṣāḇ, pāqîḏ, pāqûḏ (Nu. 31:14, 48), pequddâ (2 Ch. 24:11), rōʾš (1 Ch. 12:14, 18 [MT 15, 19]), šālîš, śar, śar šālîšîm (2 Ch. 8:9), sārîs, šôṭēr; Gk chilíarchos (Mk. 6:21), hypērétēs,
Tarpelites
Tarpelites tärʹpə-līts. The AV translation of the obscure Aramaic term ṭarpelāy (Gk. LXX Tarphallaioi) found only in Ezr. 4:9, which the RSV translates “officials” (NEB “overseers”; NIV “men of Tripolis”). A number of suggestions have been made for emendations and possible etymologies but none
Worthies
Worthies AV term meaning “prominent persons,” used to translate Heb. ʾaddîrîm (RSV “officers”; NEB “leaders”) in Nah. 2:5 (MT 6). See Officer.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Apharsachites, Apharsathchites, Apharsites
APHARSACHITES*, APHARSATHCHITES*, APHARSITES* Words used in the book of Ezra to designate certain groups of people in Samaria who joined in writing King Artaxerxes of Babylon to stop the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem. Apharsathchites (Ezr 4:9, kjv) could refer to a specific ethnic group or to
Tarpelites
TARPEL, TARPELITES* kjv rendering of “officials” in Ezra 4:9. Its precise meaning is uncertain but possibly is a Persian title or an ethnic name.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Apharsachites
APHARSACHITES, APHARSATHCHITES a name used to transliterate an Aramaic or Persian term, understood in KJV as referring to the name of a people resettled in Samaria by Asnapper (Ashurbanipal), the Assyrian king. Found in Ezr 4:9; 5:6; 6:6, KJV. RSV translates the word as “governors” following the example
Apharsites
APHARSITES. Found only in Ezr 4:9, KJV, referring to a tribe resettled in Samaria by the Assyrian king Asnapper (Ashurbanipal). RSV translates the word as “Persians.” Herzfeld believes it refers to neo-Babylonian officials (IB, III, 601).
Officer
OFFICER. In general the term designates a royal court functionary, such as a prince, steward, chamberlain, overseer, deputy, and others.1. Heb. niṣṣāb (1 Kgs 4:5; etc.) refers to deputies appointed by Solomon to administer newly established administrative centers. It was also used of an interim rules
Tarpelites
TARPELITES. One of the official (RSV “officials”) or ethnic (KJV “tarpelites”) groups associated with Rehum the Persian commander and Shimshai the scribe in writing a defamatory letter to Artaxerxes I (465–425 b.c.) against the rebuilding activities of the returned exiles (Ezr 4:9).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Officers
OFFICERS. A term used of various subordinate officials whether civil, judicial or military. The status of these officers as assisting and recording on behalf of their superiors originally may imply the ability to write (Heb. šōṭēri cf. Akkad. šaṭāru ‘to write’). The Egyptians used ‘officers’ to
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Officer, Official
Officer, OfficialA person imbued with civil, political, military, or religious responsibility. No one word in Hebrew is used for “office” or “official” in the OT because the office of an individual was implied through the description of the position. The roles of officials vary greatly because of the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Apharsachites
Apharsachites [ə färˊsə kīts] (Aram. *˒ap̱arseḵāyē˒, probably from Old Pers. frasaka; cf. Akk. iprasakku).* According to the KJV (Ezra 5:6; 6:6) a tribe living in Samaria. More recent translations recognize the term as a Persian loanword meaning “officials” or “investigators” (RSV
Apharsites
Apharsites [ə färˊsīts] (Aram. *˒ap̱ārsayē˒). Generally translated as a gentilic (RSV “Persians”), the term may actually designate an official (Ezra 4:9). The KJV renders the Apharsites as a tribe transplanted to Samaria by Assurbanipal.
Officer, Official
Officer, Official (Heb. sārîs, pāqîḏ, raḇ, śar; Gk. práktōr, hypērétēs).† A person imbued with civil, political, military, or religious responsibility.Heb. sārîs designates a eunuch or someone who has been castrated, originally a precaution taken for one who would guard the king’s
Tarpelites
Tarpelites [tärˊpə līts]. The KJV rendering of Aram. ṭarpelāyē˒ (Ezra 4:9), which has been variously interpreted as a gentilic term (NIV “men from Tripolis” [on the Phoenician coast]) and as a title for a class of Persian officials (so RSV, JB).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Officer
Officer. It is obvious that most, if not all, of the Hebrew words rendered “officer” are either of an indefinite character or are synonymous terms for functionaries known under other and more specific names, as “scribe,” “eunuch,” etc. The two words so rendered in the New Testament denote—1. An inferior
Tarpelites the
Tar´pelites, The, a race of Assyrian colonists who were planted in the cities of Samaria after the captivity of the northern kingdom of Israel. Ezra 4:9. They have not been identified with any certainty.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Officer
OFFICER. It is obvious that most, if not all, of the Heb. words rendered “officer” are either of an indefinite character or are synonymous terms for those who serve in functions known under other and more specific names such as “scribe,” “eunuch,” etc.1. Eunuch (Heb. sārı̂s, to “castrate,” Gen. 37:36;
Tarpelites
TAR´PELITES (tarʹpel-its; only Ezra 4:9, KJV). Some conjecture that the word has no ethnic connotation but is a special title of Persian officials at Samaria. See Tripolis.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Apharsachites
Apharsachitesa company of the colonists whom the Assyrian king planted in Samaria (Ezra 5:6; 6:6).
Apharsites
Apharsitesanother of the tribes removed to Samaria (Ezra 4:9), or perhaps the same as the preceding.
Chancellor
Chancellorone who has judicial authority, literally, a “lord of judgement;” a title given to the Persian governor of Samaria (Ezra 4:8, 9, 17).
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Apharsachites
ApharsachitesApharsachites (ah-farʹsah-kīts), a word used by the kjv to translate a Persian loan word (a word from one language taken into another) found in the Aramaic text of Ezra (5:6; 6:6) that denotes some type of official. These officials are among those who complain to Darius about the Jews