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Amulet
Amulets • Fetish
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Amulet
Amulet. Small object worn by an individual, usually around the neck, as a charm or means of protection against evil, witchcraft, disease, or other physical and spiritual threats. The word is probably derived from either a Latin or Arabic term meaning “to carry.” Amulets have been made of various substances
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Amulet
Amulet [Heb. laḥaš] (Isa. 3:20); AV EARRING; NEB CHARM. A small object worn on the body and generally hanging from the neck, supposed to afford protection against evil spirits. Amulets were common in all periods of Near Eastern antiquity, and many fine specimens have survived. Near Eastern amulets
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Amulet
AMULET* Small object worn by an individual, usually around the neck, as a charm or means of protection against evil, witchcraft, disease, or other physical and spiritual threats. The word is probably derived from either a Latin or Arabic term meaning “to carry.” Amulets (also known as talismans) have
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Amulet
amulet, a small object believed to be charged with divine potency and thus effective in warding off evil and inviting the protection of beneficial powers. Amulets were integral to belief in magic and derived their efficacy from close physical contact with a holy person or object. See also divination;
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Amulet
AMULET. Amulets are decorative or magical objects worn on the person or installed in the home. They are usually made of semiprecious stone, such as carnelian or soft stone covered with glaze. As objects of magic they are intended to protect against evil spirits and assure the welfare of the wearer and
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Amulets
AMULETS. The practice of wearing on the person a small symbolic object as a charm or protection against evil was common throughout the ancient Near East. Such amulets were usually in the form of small ornaments, gems, stones, seals, beads, plaques or emblems, sometimes inscribed with an incantation or
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Amulet
AmuletCharms worn to provide supernatural protection against sickness, accidents, curses, and evil spirits, and to assure physical and material well-being. Amulets were made from semiprecious stones, gems, beads, precious metals, and perishable materials, and many were inscribed with religious symbols
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Amulets
Amulets were ornaments, gems, scrolls, etc., worn as preservatives against the power of enchantments, and generally inscribed with mystic forms or characters. The “earrings” in Gen. 35:4 were obviously connected with idolatrous worship, and were probably amulets taken from the bodies of the slain Shechemites.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Amulet
AMULET (Heb. lhāshı̂m, “charms”; Isa. 3:20, KJV, “earrings”). A supposed preservative against sickness, accident, witchcraft, and evil spirits or demons. Amulets consisted of precious stones, gems, gold, and sometimes of parchment written over with some inscription. They have been widely used from antiquity
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Amulet
Amuletamulet, a small object believed charged with divine potency and thus effective in warding off evil and inviting the protection of beneficial powers. Amulets were integral to belief in magic and derived their efficacy from close physical contact with a holy person or object. Frontlets and phylacteries
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Amulet
AMULET — a charm or ornament usually assumed to have supernatural powers. Often inscribed with magic incantations, amulets supposedly protected the wearer from evil—such as sickness, disease, accidents, witchcraft, evil spirits, and demons. They also were thought to serve as aids to success.Although
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
AMULET
AMULET<am’-u-let> ( קְמִיעַ‎ [qemia], לְחָשִׁים‎ [lechashim], מְזוּזָה‎ [mezuzah], תְּפִלִּין‎ [tephillin], צִיצִת‎ [tsitsith]; [φυλακτήριον, phulakterion]): Modern scholars are of opinion that our English word amulet comes from the Latin amuletum, used by Pliny (Naturalis Historia, xxviii, 28; xxx,
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