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Amber
Electrum • Gleaming Bronze
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Amber
Amber. Fossilized resin of certain cone-bearing plants. The resinous product of these conifers loses its volatile components and turns into a translucent yellow or orange solid. The word is used in the kjv to describe a color seen in visions of the Lord (Ez 8:2). The color is similar to that of polished
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Electrum
Electrum The RV mg rendering of Heb. ḥšmal in Ezk. 1:4, 27; 8:2 (LXX ḗlektron [which LSJ, p. 768, connects with ēléktōr, “the beaming sun”]; Vulg. electrum). Ancient writers used the term “electrum” to describe a native argentiferous gold, pale yellow in color, containing from 20 to 50 percent
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Amber
AMBER Fossilized resin of certain cone-bearing plants. The resinous product of these conifers loses its volatile components and turns into a translucent yellow or orange solid. The word is used in the kjv to describe a color seen in visions of the Lord (Ez 8:2). The color is similar to that of polished
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Amber
AMBER. Heb. ḥašmal, occurring only in Ezk. 1:4, 27; 8:2 (av). The context requires ḥašmal to be something shining, but the exact denotation of the word has puzzled scholars from the rabbinic to present times. lxx renders ēlektron, meaning ‘amber’ or ‘an alloy of gold and silver’ (LSJ). Delitzsch
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Amber
AmberA yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resin (Heb. ḥašmal) used for making ornamental objects (Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2). The LXX reads Gk. ḗlektron and the Vulg. has Lat. electrum, an alloy containing four parts gold and one part silver. Others, on the basis of Akk. ešmaru (from Elam. ilmasu,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Amber
Amber (Heb. ḥašmal). A yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resin used for making ornamental objects (Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2, KJV; RSV “gleaming bronze”). see Electrum.
Electrum
Electrum. The RV mg. rendering of Heb. ḥašmal at Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2. Following the LXX (ḗlektron) or Vulgate (electrum), some scholars consider electrum an alloy containing four parts gold and one part silver; others, on the basis of Akk. ešmaru (from Elam. ilmasu “inlay” or “bronze”)
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Amber
Amber (Heb. chasmal) occurs only in Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2. It is usually supposed that the Hebrew word chasmal denotes a metal, and not the fossil resin called amber.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Amber
Amber(Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2. Heb., hashmal, rendered by the LXX. elektron, and by the Vulgate electrum), a metal compounded of silver and gold. Some translate the word by “polished brass,” others “fine brass,” as in Rev. 1:15; 2:18. It was probably the mixture now called electrum. The word has no connection,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ELECTRUM
ELECTRUM<e-lek’-trum>: The Revised Version, margin rendering of [חַשְׁמַל‎, chashmal], of Ezekiel 1:4, 27; 8:2 Septuagint [ἥλεκτρον, elektron], Vulgate (Jerome’s Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) electrum). Both the King James Version and the English Revised Version have “amber” while the American
Compton’s Encyclopedia
amber
amberMillions of years ago in the Oligocene epoch of the Earth’s history, clear resin seeped from pine trees growing in the Baltic Sea basin. As centuries passed, lumps of this resin were covered by layers of soil. The Ice Age glaciers poured over it. The resin was hardened by time and pressure into
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Amber
Am′ber. This fossilised vegetable resin is, according to legend, a concretion of birds’ tears. The birds were the sisters of Meleāger, who never ceased weeping for the death of their brother.—Ovid: Metamorphoses, viii. line 270, etc.“Around thee shall glisten the loveliest amberThat ever the sorrowing
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Amber
Amʹber, in ordinary acceptation a beautiful fossil resin, susceptible of a fine polish and presenting several colors, the most common being yellow and orange. It is found in lumps near the shores of the Baltic Sea. The word occurs in three passages (Ezek. 1:4, 27; 8:2), where the reference is thought
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