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Algum wood
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Algum
Algum (אַלְגּוּמִּים‎, algummim). Also Almug (אַלְמֻגִּים‎, almuggim). A type of tree (2 Chr 2:8–10; 1 Kgs 10:12). The wood from these trees was brought from Ophir for the construction of Solomon’s temple and his palace.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Algum
Algum. Wood imported from Lebanon (2 Chr 2:8) and possibly Ophir (9:10, 11) for the construction of the temple and the palace, and for musical instruments. The term may be a scribe’s error of transposition for “almug” tree.See Plants (Algum).
Almug
Almug. Wood imported from Ophir for the construction of the temple, the palaces, and for lyres and harps of the temple musicians (1 Kgs 10:11, 12).See Plants (Algum).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Algum
Algum alʹgum [Heb. ’algûmmîm] (2 Ch. 2:8; 9:10f); ALMUG [Heb. ’almug̱îm] (1 K. 10:11f). The location of Ophir in these references is connected with the identification of these trees. Ophir was first mentioned during the early monarchy as the source of gold left by David for the temple (1 Ch. 29:4),
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Algum
ALGUM* Wood imported from Lebanon (2 Chr 2:8) and possibly Ophir (2 Chr 9:10–11) for the construction of the temple and the palace and for musical instruments. The term may be a copyist’s error of transposition for “almug” tree. See Almug; Plants (Algum).
Almug
ALMUG Wood imported from Ophir for the construction of the temple, the palaces, and for lyres and harps of the temple musicians (1 Kgs 10:11–12). See Algum; Plants (Algum).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Almug
almug (al´muhg), a special kind of wood, perhaps red sandalwood (Pterocarpus santalinus). Almug was imported from Ophir (southwest Arabia) by Hiram of Tyre and used in the construction of Solomon’s temple and for musical instruments (1 Kings 10:11–12). The parallels in 2 Chron. 2:7 and 9:10–11 have “algum,”
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Algum, Almug
Algum, AlmugAlgum (Heb. ʾalgŝmɩ̂m; 2 Chr. 2:8; 9:10–11) and almug (ʾalmuggɩ̂m; 1 Kgs. 10:11–12) are considered to be the same wood, red saunders or red sandalwood (Pterocarpus santolinus L. f.). Red sandalwood is heavy, hard, and close-grained and would have been suitable for the supports and instruments
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Algum
Algum [ălˊgŭm] (Heb. ˒algûmmîm). A type of timber requested of Hiram of Lebanon by King Solomon for the construction of the temple (2 Chr. 2:8) and other projects (9:10). If the Hebrew word is a transposition for “almug” (a very likely possibility), Solomon specified the Pterocarpus santalinus
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Algum
Algum or Almug Trees, the former occurring in 2 Chron. 2:8; 9:10, 11, the latter in 1 Kings 10:11, 12. These words are identical. From 1 Kings 10:11, 12; 2 Chron. 9:10, 11, we learn that the almug was brought in great plenty from Ophir for Solomon’s temple and house, and for the construction of musical
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Almug
Almug(1 Kings 10:11, 12) = algum (2 Chr. 2:8; 9:10, 11), in the Hebrew occurring only in the plural almuggim (indicating that the wood was brought in planks), the name of a wood brought from Ophir to be used in the building of the temple, and for other purposes. Some suppose it to have been the white
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Almug
Almugalmug (alʹmuhg), a special kind of wood, perhaps red sandalwood (Pterocarpus santalinus). Almug was imported from Ophir (southwest Arabia) by Hiram of Tyre and used in the construction of Solomon’s Temple and for musical instruments (1 Kings 10:11–12). The parallels in 2 Chron. 2:7 and 9:10–11
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ALGUM OR ALMUG
ALGUM OR ALMUG<al’-gum>, ( אַלְגּוּמִּים‎ [’algummim] (2 Chronicles 2:8; 9:10 f); ( אַלְמֻגִּים‎ [’almuggim], 1 Kings 10:11 f)): It is generally supposed that these two names refer to one kind of tree, the consonants being transposed as is not uncommon in Semitic words. Solomon sent to Hiram, king
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Almug
Alʹmug (or Alʹgum) Trees, the former occurring in 1 Kings 10:11, 12, the latter in 2 Chron. 2:8; 9:10, 11. The two words are evidently identical, and indicate trees which furnished a rare and costly wood in great demand for fine work. The wood probably was the red sandal-wood of India and Ceylon. It
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