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Alabaster
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
Alabaster (ἀλάβαστρον, alabastron). A type of stone used to make vases and jars. The word occurs in the Bible only in the three passages of the Synoptic Gospels in connection with the vessel of expensive perfume, which a woman used to anoint Jesus with as he dined in the house of Simon the leper (Matt
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Alabaster
Alabaster. White or translucent stone, sometimes veined, frequently used to make vases and flasks.See Minerals, Metals, and Precious Stones.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Alabaster
Alabaster [Heb. šēš] (Cant. 5:15); AV, NEB, MARBLE; ALABASTER JAR (Mt. 26:7; Mk. 14:3); FLASK [GK. alábastron] (Lk. 7:37); AV “alabaster box”; NEB “small bottle,” “small flask.” In modern mineralogy alabaster is crystalline gypsum or sulphate of lime. The Gk. word alábastron or alábastos meant
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
ALABASTER* White or translucent stone, sometimes veined, frequently used to make vases and flasks. See Minerals and Metals; Stones, Precious.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Alabaster
alabaster, compact, translucent gypsum often carved into vases. The nt mentions a globular perfume flask carved from alabaster; made without handles, it had a long neck that was broken to pour out the perfume (Mark 14:3; Matt. 26:7; cf. Luke 7:37).Alabaster vessels from Deir el-Balah, 1500–1200 bce.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Alabaster
AlabasterA firm, very fine-grained, variety of gypsum, used for statuary and as an indoor decorative stone, especially for carved ornamental vases and figures. It is translucent, and usually white, but may be shaded or tinted with other light-colored tones. The biblical terms translated alabaster (Heb.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
Alabaster (Heb. šēš; cf. Egyp. šś; Gk. alábastron). A name applied in the biblical text to two types of stone: a calcium carbonate (possibly the white marble of Esth. 1:6), and a gypsum or calcium sulfate, a soft stone, somewhat transparent and sometimes veined. The softer type was frequently
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Alabaster
ALABASTER The garden of the king’s palace at Shushan was paved with red, blue, white and black marble (Authorized Version: Esther 1:6). The Hebrew Bible uses the word bahat instead of marble. (It is not really known what this Hebrew word meant in antiquity, but today it is used for alabaster.) Chemically,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
Alabaster, from the Arabic al bastraton, a whitish stone, or from Albastron, the place in Egypt where it is found. It occurs only in Matt. 26:7; Mark 14:3; Luke 7:37. The ancients considered alabaster to be the best material in which to preserve their ointments. The Oriental alabaster (referred to in
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
Alabasteroccurs only in the New Testament in connection with the box of “ointment of spikenard very precious,” with the contents of which a woman anointed the head of Jesus as he sat at supper in the house of Simon the leper (Matt. 26:7; Mark 14:3; Luke 7:37). These boxes were made from a stone found
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Alabaster
Alabasteralabaster, compact, translucent gypsum often carved into vases. In the nt a globular perfume flask carved from alabaster is mentioned. Made without handles it had a long neck that was broken to pour out the perfume (Mark 14:3; Matt. 26:7).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ALABASTER
ALABASTER<al’-a-bas-ter> ([ἀλάβαστρον, alabastron] (Matthew 26:7; Mark 14:3; Luke 7:37)): In modern mineralogy alabaster is crystalline gypsum or sulphate of lime. The Greek word alabastron or alabastos meant a stone casket or vase, and alabastites was used for the stone of which the casket
Key passages
Mk 14:3

And while he was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he was reclining for a meal, a woman came holding an alabaster flask of very costly perfumed oil of genuine nard. After breaking the alabaster flask, she poured it out on his head.

See also
Topics & Themes