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Akhenaten
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
(“Aten Directs”). The self-adopted name of Pharaoh Amenophis IV, who ruled 1358–1340 bc (late dating method); the 10th pharaoh in the 18th Dynasty of the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt. Also called Amenhotep IV.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Akhenaten
Akhenaten (“Aten Directs”). The self-adopted name of Pharaoh Amenophis IV, who ruled 1358–1340 bc (late dating method); the 10th pharaoh in the 18th Dynasty of the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt. Also called Amenhotep IV.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Akhenaton
Akhenaton (ahk´uh-nah´tuhn), or Amenophis (ah-men´oh-fis), or Amenhotep (ah-men´hoh-tep) IV, the “heretic” king of Egypt ca. 1364–1347 bce and one of the most controversial figures of antiquity. A pharaoh of the powerful Eighteenth Dynasty (1546–1319 bce), he is best known for his promotion of the exclusive
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Akhenaton
AKHENATON. Succeeded his father, Amenhotep III, as ruler of Egypt c. 1370 b.c. He inspired the Amarna revolution (see Amarna, Tell el-), which displaced the other gods by the Aton, or sun disk. He deified the light of the sun, devising a new symbol for the new god: the sun disk with diverging rays radiating
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Akhenaten
Akhenaten (Egyp. ʾkh-n-ɩʾtn)Egyptian king of the 18th Dynasty noted primarily for his religious reforms. The second son of Amenhotep III and his great wife Tiye, Akhenaten came to the throne upon his father’s sudden death and ruled for 17 years (1379–1362 b.c.). Akhenaten’s principal wife was Nefertiti,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Akhenaten
Akhenaten [äˊkə näˊtən] (Egyp. ˒kh-n-i̓tn “it is well with Aton”).* Amenhotep IV, pharaoh of the Egyptian Eighteenth Dynasty (ca. 1363–1347 B.C.) and son of Amenhotep III (“the Magnificent”), with whom he may have ruled for a time as coregent. His queen was Nefertiti. In the sixth year of his
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Akhenaton
AkhenatonAkhenaton (ahkh-uh-nahʹtuhn) or Amenophis (ah-men«oh-fis) or Amenhotep (ah-men«hoh-tep) IV, the ‘heretic’ king of Egypt (ca. 1364-1347 b.c.) and one of the most controversial figures of antiquity. A pharaoh of the powerful eighteenth dynasty (1546-1319 b.c.), he is best known for his promotion
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Akhenaton
AkhenatonIn the 14th century bc the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep IV undertook a religious reform by trying to displace all the traditional deities with the sun god Aton (also spelled Aten). In the god’s honor, the pharaoh changed his name to Akhenaton (also spelled Ikhnaton), which means “beneficial to
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Akhenaton
AKHENATON (Ăkh·ȧ·nāʹ tŏn) Egyptian Pharaoh (1370–1353 b.c.) Originally named Amenhotep IV, he made a radical religious switch from worshiping Amon to serving Aton, the sun disc. Often referred to as the first monotheist, he probably did not go so far as denying the existence of all other gods. Later
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Akhenaten
Akhenaten akh′uh-naht′uhn (Egyp. “Blessed Spirit of Aten” or “Beneficial to Aten”). Also Akhenaton. King of Egypt c. 1370–1353 b.c. and founder of the city now known as Tell el-Amarna. He was still a teenager when, either as coregent or as king, he replaced his father as effective ruler of Egypt under
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
AKHENATEN
AKHENATEN. Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV), tenth king of the Eighteenth Egyptian Dynasty, is credited with founding the world’s first monotheistic religion. His accomplishments have passed into history under the name Amarna, after the site of his capital, Tell el-Amarna. The historical era incorporating the