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Agnosticism
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Generally refers to the point of view that remaining noncommittal is preferable on questions where certainty is unattainable. Agnosticism is commonly included as one of the possible beliefs people may hold with reference to the existence of God or gods. For example, atheism refers to the denial of the existence of God or gods. Polytheism indicates belief in a plurality of gods. Pantheism refers to the belief that God and the universe are one. In this context, agnosticism refers to the view that there is not enough evidence to be certain whether or not God exists, so the best option is to suspend judgment and not commit to either the existence or nonexistence of God. This indifferent attitude is sometimes called “practical atheism.”
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Agnosticism
Agnosticism Generally refers to the point of view that remaining noncommittal is preferable on questions where certainty is unattainable. Agnosticism is commonly included as one of the possible beliefs people may hold with reference to the existence of God or gods. For example, atheism refers to the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
agnosticism
agnosticism. As most commonly understood, the view that we cannot really know whether there is a God or not. The invention of the word is generally ascribed to T. H. *Huxley, who is said to have coined it in 1869 on the basis of Acts 17:23. Agnosticism is sometimes associated with those who stress the
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Agnosticism
Agnosticism. Agnosticism comes from two Greek words (a, “no”; gnosis, “knowledge”). The term agnosticism was coined by T. H. Huxley. It literally means “no-knowledge,” the opposite of a Gnostic (Huxley, vol. 5; see Gnosticism). Thus, an agnostic is someone who claims not to know. As applied to knowledge
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Agnostic
Agnostic (An). A term invented by Prof. Huxley in 1885 to indicate the mental attitude of those who withhold their assent to whatever is incapable of proof, such as the absolute. In regard to miracles and revelation, agnostics neither dogmatically accept nor reject such matters, but simply say Agnosco
The Thiselton Companion to Christian Theology
Agnosticism
AgnosticismAgnosticism must be distinguished carefully from atheism. Agnosticism holds that to affirm or deny the existence of God is impossible because of the limitations of human knowledge. T. H. Huxley is generally thought to have coined the term to affirm a value-neutral approach to belief in God.
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Agnosticism
AgnosticismA term coined in 1869 by Thomas Huxley to denote his theory that no one can know whether God exists, or indeed that anything exists which cannot be empirically* investigated.See Atheism (Sceptical); Empiricism.
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Agnosticism
Agnosticism. Generally, the view that we do not know either in practice or in principle whether there is a God. Although etymologically the term applies to any kind of skepticism, T. H. Huxley coined it in 1869 for religious skepticism. Agnosticism contrasts with atheism and pantheism, as well as theism
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
AGNOSTIC
AGNOSTIC, AGNOSTICISM [ἀγνωσία agnōsia, ἄγνωστος agnōstos]. A position that the mind cannot know with absolute certainty God’s existence and nature. T. H. Huxley coined the term, referring to the Athenians’ worship of the “unknown god” (Acts 17:23). Precursors to this position include Protagoras,
New Dictionary of Theology: Historical and Systematic
Agnosticism
AGNOSTICISMA term coined by T. H. Huxley (1825–95) to express the view that since God’s existence can neither be proved nor disproved the only rational position on the question is to suspend or withhold judgment or belief. Huxley added a negative prefix (‘a’) to the Greek term ‘gnostic’, referring to