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Africa
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The continent of Africa is not mentioned by name in the Bible, but North Africa was considered part of the Mediterranean world and various North African places are named in the Old and New Testaments. Egypt was a major power in the political world of the Ancient Near East, and figures in many Old Testament events, most notably the Exodus story. In the New Testament, Egypt was Mary and Joseph’s destination when they fled from Herod. Cush/Ethiopia was also important. Philip the Evangelist baptized an Ethiopian Eunuch. In Greek and Latin, North Africa was called Libya; Cyrene was its central city.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Africa
Africa The continent of Africa is not mentioned by name in the Bible, but North Africa was considered part of the Mediterranean world and various North African places are named in the Old and New Testaments. Egypt was a major power in the political world of the Ancient Near East, and figures in many
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Africa
Africa The continent that forms the southern portion of the Europe-Asia-Africa land mass. It is not named in the Bible. Because North Africa is separated from the rest of the continent by the desert and the mountains of Abyssinia, except for the Nile Valley and the swampy coastlands of West Africa,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Africa
AfricaAlthough the Bible does not mention Africa by name, various North African places and peoples figure prominently in the events and imagery of both the OT and NT.Most frequently mentioned is Egypt. From the time of the patriarchs to the time of the apostles, Egypt possessed an abundant grain resource
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Africa
Africa. *Although the continent itself is not named in the Bible, various North African places and peoples figure in the events and imagery of both the Old and New Testaments.The Table of Nations recorded in Gen. 10 names among the “sons of Ham” Cush, Egypt (Mizraim), and Put (probably Puṭaya near
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Africa, Christianity in
Africa, Christianity in. Apart from Egypt and the Mediterranean coast (Roman ‘Africa’, on which see the following entry), Christianity had by the 4th cent. penetrated to *Nubia, where it died out in the 16th cent., and to *Ethiopia, but it did not spread further south until the era of Portuguese
Africa, the Church in Roman
Africa, the Church in Roman. How Christianity spread to Roman ‘Africa’ (i.e. roughly Tripoli, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco) is unknown. The earliest evidence is that of the ‘*Acts’ of the *Scillitan martyrs (180); and the ‘Passion’ of St *Perpetua (203) and the works of *Tertullian (c. 197–c. 220)
Encyclopedia of the Reformed Faith
Africa
AfricaDuring the twentieth century, the part of Africa south of the Sahara has seen one of the most dramatic growth rates in the history of the church. This has affected the whole range of Christian communities—Roman Catholic, Protestant, and African Independent. Simultaneously there has been a dramatic
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
AFRICA
AFRICA<af’-ri-ka>: The name of this tract, as a continent, does not occur in the Bible, and it was only in later days known as one of the quarters of the world, under the name of Libya — that portion opposite the coast of Greece and West of Egypt.
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Africa
AfricaAfrica.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.There are more than 50 independent countries in Africa and on the islands off its coasts. Together, they make up more than one-fourth of the membership of the United Nations. In 1991 Egyptian Deputy Prime Minister Boutros Boutros-Ghali became
South Africa
South AfricaSouth Africa.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.In the late 20th century South Africa began a tremendous transformation. From about 1950 until 1994 the country’s large and diverse nonwhite population was legally dominated by the white minority in nearly every sphere of
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Africa
Africa. Teneo te, Africa (I take possession of thee, O Africa). When Cæsar landed at Adrumētum, in Africa, he tripped and fell—a bad omen; but, with wonderful presence of mind, he pretended that he had done so intentionally, and kissing the soil, exclaimed, “Thus do I take possession of thee, O Africa.”
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Africa
Africa. One of the seven continents of the world (the name as such does not occur in the Bible). It is uncertain what knowledge the ancients had of the continent as a whole, though Herodotus believed it was washed by the sea on all sides (Hist. 4.42). Israel’s closest acquaintance was, of course, with
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Epigraphy: North Africa
Epigraphy: North AfricaAfter considering North African inscriptions in general, we look specifically at Christian inscriptions in the region.
North Africa
North AfricaWorkshops in early Christian North Africa (→ Tunisia and → Algeria) produced a great range of traditional c. types, some much like those of central Italy, and others with variations stemming from local Punic traditions. Made of local marble, limestone, or sandstone, c. progressively became