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Adoption
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Greek phrase that describes the act of raising a child who is not biologically related. Used by Paul to describe God adopting humans—implied elsewhere in the Bible to represent membership in the family of God.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Adoption
Adoption (υἱοθεσία, huiothesia). A Greek phrase that describes the act of raising a child who is not biologically related. Used by Paul to describe God adopting humans—implied elsewhere in the Bible to represent membership in the family of God.
Adoption in the Ancient Near East
Adoption in the Ancient Near East An act by which a man or woman acknowledges a person of different blood as his or her son or daughter and bestows on that person the legal rights and duties of a true child.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Adoption
ADOPTION. The creation of a kinship relationship between two individuals that is recognized as essentially equivalent to one stemming from natural descent. In the ancient Near East, such ties were typically between adoptive parent(s) and a son or daughter, but individuals were adopted into other roles
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Adoption
Adoption. Theologically, the act of God by which believers become members of “God’s family” with all the privileges and obligations of family membership. “Sons of God,” a common kjv expression, includes individuals of both sexes numbered among God’s children (Is 43:6; 2 Cor 6:18).According to the NT,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Adoption; Sonship
Adoption; Sonship [GK. huiothesía]. The Greek term occurs in the Bible only in Paul’s Epistles (Rom. 8:15, 23; 9:4; Gal. 4:5; Eph. 1:5); for extrabiblical usage see MM, pp. 648f The AV and RV have “adoption” throughout. The RSV has “adoption” in Rom. 8:23; Gal. 4:5, and “sonship” in Rom. 8:15; 9:4;
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Adoption
ADOPTION Theologically, the act of God by which believers become members of “God’s family” with all the privileges and obligations of family membership. “Sons of God,” a common kjv expression, includes individuals of both sexes numbered among God’s children (Is 43:6; 2 Cor 6:18).According to the NT,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Adoption
adoption. In the nt, Paul uses adoption as a metaphor for salvation. Paul indicates that people become adopted as heirs of God through faith (by virtue of the mediation of the Son and the Spirit) and are thus enabled to utter “Abba, Father” (Rom. 8:15; Gal. 4:6; cf. Rom. 8:23; 9:4; Eph. 1:5). The image
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Adoption
ADOPTION. The word itself is used in the Bible only in a theological sense. In a civil or legal sense the practice of adoption was exemplified outside the cultural milieu of Israel in the adoption of Moses (Ex 2:10; Acts 7:21, RSV) and of Esther (Est 2:7, 15).In partriarchal times the ancient Near East
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Adoption
AdoptionThe legal transfer of a person from a family or slavery into another family, thereby improving the situation of the adopter and adoptee. The NT uses adoption imagery to depict the relationship between believers and God. Paul assumed that the image was first applied to God’s relationship with
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Adoption
Adoption. †In the ancient Near East adoption was an important means of ensuring succession within families and of providing for transmission of property. The practice is suggested in Gen. 15:2ff., which depicts Abraham’s adoption of his slave Eliezer of Damascus as his heir. Moses is adopted by the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Adoption
Adoption, sonshipIn the Pauline letters the Greek word huiothesia is used either of the Israelites (Rom 9:4) or of believers (Gal 4:5; Rom 8:15, 23; Eph 1:5) as sons of God. There is, however, some disagreement as to how to translate the term, whether as “adoption” or, more generally, as “sonship.”
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Sonship, Child, Children
Sonship, Child, ChildrenThe terminology of childhood features with remarkable infrequency in the NT (see DJG, Child, Children) and is not mentioned at all in most of the literature surveyed here. Where it occurs the motif has three dominant usages. 1. Childhood as an Image of Growth 2. Childhood as
Key passages
Ho 11:1

When Israel was a child, I loved him, and out of Egypt I called my son.

Jn 1:12–13

But as many as received him—to those who believe in his name—he gave to them authority to become children of God, who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of a husband, but of God.

Ro 8:14–17

For all those who are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God. For you have not received a spirit of slavery leading to fear again, but you have received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry out, “Abba! Father!” The Spirit himself confirms to our spirit that we are children of God, …

Ga 4:4–7

But when the fullness of time came, God sent out his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order that he might redeem those under the law, in order that we might receive the adoption. And because you are sons, God sent out the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying out, “Abba! (Father!),” …

Eph 1:5–6

having predestined us to adoption through Jesus Christ to himself according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his grace that he bestowed on us in the beloved,