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Adonai
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A name for God, which is translated “Lord.” Its vowels are found in the Masoretic Text with the proper name for God: יהוה‎ (yhwh) (YHWH; also called the tetragrammaton). In Jewish tradition, when reading the Hebrew text, one substitutes “Adonai” instead of pronouncing the tetragrammaton. For more information, see these articles: Jehovah; Tetragrammaton; YHWH.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Adonai
Adonai (אֲדֹנָי‎, adonay). A name for God, which is translated “Lord.” Its vowels are found in the Masoretic Text with the proper name for God: יהוה‎ (yhwh) (YHWH; also called the tetragrammaton). In Jewish tradition, when reading the Hebrew text, one substitutes “Adonai” instead of pronouncing the tetragrammaton.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Adonai
ADONAI [Heb ʾădōnāy (אֲדֹנָי)]. One of the various names of God in the Hebrew Bible. The term is derived from Heb ʾādôn (“lord”), which in the biblical text refers both to the deity and to human rulers. Adonai is a modified form of the plural of ʾādôn: it bears the first-person suffix “my” and
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Adonai
Adonai. Divine name translated as “Lord” signifying honor, majesty, and sovereignty.See God, Names of.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Adonai
Adonai a-dōʹnī [Heb. aḏōnāy—‘my sovereign’]. A divine name, translated in most versions “the Lord,” or “my Lord.” Its vowels are found in the MT with the unpronounceable tetragrammaton YHWH; and when the Jewish reader came to these letters, he substituted in pronunciation the word “Adonai,” rather
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Adonai
ADONAI* Divine name translated as “Lord” signifying honor, majesty, and sovereignty. See God, Names of.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Adonai
Adonai (Heb. ʾăḏōnāy)A divine name, generally translated “the Lord” or “my Lord.” In the late postexilic period it became a substitute for the unspeakable name of God. The Masoretes wrote the vowels of this name with the consonants of the name Yahweh (YHWH), indicating to the reader that it was to
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Adonai
Adonai [ə dōˊ nī] (Heb. ˒aḏōnāy, “my lord”). A divine name, generally translated “the Lord” or “my Lord.” In the late postexilic period it became a substitute for the unspeakable name of God. The Masoretes wrote the vowels of this name with the consonants of the name Yahweh (yhwh), indicating
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Adonai
Adonai (Heb. אֲדֹנָי, plur. of אָדוֹן, ‘master’, ‘Lord’; the use of the plural prob. implies a ‘sense of majesty’). Divine name, frequently used in the OT. The Jews also read it for the unutterable name of Yahweh, which, in the text of the Hebrew Bible, is usually pointed with the vowel signs proper
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ADONAI
ADONAI<a-do’-ni>, <ad-o-na’-i> ( אֲדֹנָי‎ [’adhonay]): A Divine name, translated “Lord,” and signifying, from its derivation, “sovereignty.” Its vowels are found in the Massoretic Text with the unpronounceable tetragrammaton יהוה‎ [YHWH]; and when the Hebrew reader came to these letters, he always
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Adonai
Ado′nai. Son of the star-beam, and god of light among the Rosicru′cians. One of the names given by the Jews to Jehovah, for fear of breaking the command, “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord [Jehovah] thy God in vain.”
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Adonai
Adonai (Hebr. lord, sovereign, master).—Habitual name of which the Jews made use to designate God, not daring to pronounce his proper name which is Jehovah. They claim that the latter name was pronounced only once a year, on the day of expiation, by the high-priest, in the Holy of Holies.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Adonai
Adonai ad′oh-ni′ (אֲדֹנָיH151 [a pl. form with 1st person sg. pronoun], from אָדוֹןH123, a common term for “lord, master”). Also Adonay. A divine name usually translated “the Lord.” When in combination with the Tetragrammaton (YHWH), the NIV renders the phrase “Sovereign Lord.” Its etymology is obscure,
Key passages
Ge 15:2

Then Abram said, “O Yahweh, my Lord, what will you give me? I continue to be childless, and my heir is Eliezer of Damascus.”