Loading…
Addressees of Moses
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Deuteronomy, Book of
Deuteronomy, Book of The last of the five books of the Pentateuch. Presents a summary of the narrative of Exodus-Numbers and reiterates laws and regulations found in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers.
Deuteronomy, Book of, Critical Issues
Deuteronomy, Book of, Critical Issues Surveys major issues in critical biblical scholarship related to the interpretation of Deuteronomy, including the social and historical background of the book’s composition and its relationship with other biblical and ancient Near Eastern texts.
Exodus, Book of
Exodus, Book of The story of God’s miraculous deliverance of Israel from slavery in Egypt. Records the Israelites’ journey to Mount Sinai, where they agree to become God’s covenant people and begin to learn how to worship and obey Him.
Exodus, Book of, Critical Issues
Exodus, Book of, Critical Issues Overview of interpretive issues related to the book of Exodus raised by various approaches in biblical scholarship.
Genesis, Book of
Genesis, Book of The first book of the Hebrew Bible. Narrates events starting with creation until Jacob’s death after his family settled in Egypt. Sets the stage for the book of Exodus. Outlines God’s relationship to the world and the whole created order, most notably through the people of Israel—the
Genesis, Book of, Critical Issues
Genesis, Book of, Critical Issues Details the coverage in Lexham Bible Dictionary related to additional scholarship on Genesis.
Leviticus, Book of
Leviticus, Book of Third book of the Pentateuch. Portrays the rituals that priests must regulate and perform to maintain God’s presence with His people. Primarily concerned with sacrifice and regulations for maintaining holiness. Referred to as the “priests’ law,” “priests’ book,” and “the law of the
Leviticus, Book of, Critical Issues
Leviticus, Book of, Critical Issues Surveys scholarly topics related to the study of Leviticus.
Numbers, Book of
Numbers, Book of Numbers is the fourth book in the Hebrew Bible and is part of the Torah. It recounts the historic events of Israel’s experience with her God, Yahweh, from her time at Mount Sinai until her arrival at the plains of Moab. The purpose of the book is both theological and practical. Theologically
Numbers, Book of, Critical Issues
Numbers, Book of, Critical Issues Surveys significant scholarship on Numbers from recent decades as evidenced in commentaries, ancient-version studies, historical and literary-critical analyses, and theological inquiries.
Pentateuch
Pentateuch The first five books of the Old Testament, known as the Torah in the Hebrew Bible. Also sometimes called “the Law,” although that term has additional connotations (e.g., Moses’ teachings; just Deuteronomy) and is not always synonymous with the Pentateuch or Torah. For additional information
Torah
Torah (תּוֹרָה‎, torah). The first five books of the Hebrew Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Also known as the Pentateuch or Law.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Genesis, Book of
GENESIS, BOOK OF. Genesis is the first book of the Hebrew Bible. The name of the book is derived from Genesis 2:4a in the Greek translation: “This is the book of the origins (geneseōs) of heaven and earth.” The book is called Genesis in the Septuagint, whence the name came into the Vulgate and eventually
Torah (Pentateuch)
TORAH (PENTATEUCH). The Torah is the section of the Bible composed of the first five books: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The name Torah derives from Hebrew tôrâ, meaning “instruction.” The work is also known as the Pentateuch, from Greek pentateuchos, meaning a five-book work,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Deuteronomy, Book of
Deuteronomy, Book of. Fifth book of the OT, and last of the Pentateuch (the five books of the Law). In it Moses restated to the people of Israel various laws and precepts of the covenant which God had revealed to them at Mt Sinai. Thus the book has become known in Greek and Latin tradition as Deuteronomy
Exodus, Book of
Exodus, Book of. Second book of the Bible, containing the story of God’s liberation of the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt. Few books of the OT are as important historically and theologically as the Book of Exodus.Historically, the exodus event was the birth of Israel as a nation. At Mt Sinai
Leviticus, Book of
Leviticus, Book of. Third book of the OT, largely concerned with the duties of the levitical priests.
Numbers, Book of
Numbers, Book of. Fourth book of the English Bible. Its title is the English translation of the Latin Vulgate title, Numeri. The book takes this name from the fact that several rosters of various kinds are recorded in the book, specifically, the two army musters in chapters 1 and 26, the tribal camp
Pentateuch
Pentateuch. Word formed by two Greek words, pente, “five,” and teuchos, “book” and commonly used to refer to the first five books of the OT (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy). This portion of God’s Word was written by the prophet Moses (Ex 17:14; 24:4; 34:27; Nm 33:1, 2; Dt 31:9, 22)
Torah
Torah. Word translated “law” in the OT, derived from the Hebrew verbal root, yarah, which means “to throw” or “to shoot.” The idea behind the word is to inform, instruct, direct, or guide. In Jewish tradition it is most frequently used to designate the text of the first five books of the Bible, also
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Pentateuch
Pentateuch penʹtə-tōōk [<Gk pénta—‘five’ + teúchos ‘book’]. The first five books of the Bible. I. Introduction II. ContentsA. Theological MessageB. Historical DimensionC. Literary Character III. Significance IV. Origin, Composition, Authorship, and NatureA. Precritical Positions1. OT2.
Torah
Torah A Hebrew term, normally rendered “law,” and universally recognized as central to OT and postbiblical Jewish piety. Both the meaning of the term and the role Torah has played in the religious thinking of Jews remain, however, subjects of debate. I. The Term II. SignificanceA. “Law” in OT Piety
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Deuteronomy, Book of
DEUTERONOMY, BOOK OF Fifth book of the OT, and last of the Pentateuch (the five books of the Law). In it Moses restated to the people of Israel various laws and precepts of the covenant that God had revealed to them at Mt Sinai. Thus, the book has become known in Greek and Latin tradition as Deuteronomy
Exodus, Book of
EXODUS, BOOK OF Second book of the Bible, containing the story of God’s liberation of the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt. Few books of the OT are as important historically and theologically as the book of Exodus.Historically, the exodus event was the birth of Israel as a nation. At Mt Sinai
Genesis, Book of
GENESIS, BOOK OF First book of the Bible.PreviewNameAuthorDatePurposeStructureContentName The name Genesis comes into English as a transliteration of the Greek word meaning “origin” or “beginning.” This name was given to the book in the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, known
Leviticus, Book of
LEVITICUS, BOOK OF Third book of the OT, largely concerned with the duties of the Levitical priests.PreviewAuthorDateBackgroundPurpose and TheologyContentAncient Hebrew Text in Leviticus Leviticus 27:11–19 in 11QpaleolevAuthor A traditional alternative title of Leviticus is the Third
Numbers, Book of
NUMBERS, BOOK OF Fourth book of the English Bible. Its title is the English translation of the Latin Vulgate title, Numeri. The book takes this name from the fact that several rosters of various kinds are recorded in the book, specifically, the two army musters in chapters 1 and 26, the tribal camp and
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH* Word formed by two Greek words, pente (“five”) and teuchos (“case”) and commonly used to refer to the first five books of the OT (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), which were encased together, as in one book. This portion of God’s Word was written by Moses (Ex 17:14; 24:4;
Torah
TORAH* Word translated “law” in the OT, derived from the Hebrew verbal root yarah, which means “to throw” or “to shoot.” The idea behind the word is to inform, instruct, direct, or guide. In Jewish tradition it is most frequently used to designate the text of the first five books of the Bible, also called
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Deuteronomy, Book Of
Deuteronomy (doo´tuh-ron´uh-mee; Gk., “the second law”), book of, the fifth of the Five Books of Moses, or the Torah, of the Tanakh (Jewish Bible); the fifth book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot. Its Hebrew name is devarim, meaning “words,” from the opening sentence, “These are the words that Moses
Exodus, Book Of
Exodus, book of, the second of the Five Books of Moses (the Torah) of the Tanakh (Jewish Bible); it is the second book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot. The name Exodus is taken from the lxx’s name for the book, exodos, which means “an exit” or “a going out,” found in 19:1 and 23:16. The Hebrew
Genesis, Book Of
Genesis (jen´uh-sis), book of, the first of the Five Books of Moses (the Torah) of the Tanakh (Jewish Bible); it is the first book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot. The Hebrew name of the book is bereshit, meaning “in the beginning,” which is the first Hebrew phrase of the book. The English name
Leviticus, Book Of
Leviticus (li-vit´i-kuhs), book of, the third of the Five Books of Moses, or the Torah section, of the Tanakh (Jewish Bible); it is the third book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot. Leviticus immediately follows Exodus and is followed by Numbers. Leviticus continues the record of the Israelites’
Numbers, Book Of
Numbers, book of, the fourth of the Five Books of Moses (Torah) in the Tanakh (Jewish Bible) and the fourth book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot; it follows Leviticus and precedes Deuteronomy. Its Hebrew name is bemidbar, “in the wilderness,” taken from the first sentence of the book, “And the
Pentateuch
Pentateuch (pen´tuh-took), a traditional name used by Christians for the first five books of the Bible. The books are also known as the “books of Moses” or the “Law of Moses.” They represent the Torah, the first portion of the Tanakh, Jewish Bible. See also law; Old Testament; Pentateuch, sources of
Torah
Torah (toh´ruh; Heb., “instruction” or “teaching”), God’s instructions to Israel. The Hebrew word torah is often translated “law” in English Bibles, following the Greek translation of the word as nomos in the lxx. The word nomos does have a much stronger legal connotation than torah, but even nomos in
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Deuteronomy, Book of (Writing)
DEUTERONOMY, BOOK OF. This is the last of the five books of the Pentateuch. Its name comes through the Latin Vulgate from the LXX title deuteronomion, “repetition of the law,” based on a misunderstanding of the words “copy of this law” in Deut 17:18.Ancient Jewish and Christian writers unanimously attribute
Exodus, Book of (Writing)
EXODUS, BOOK OFThe NameThe second book of the Torah (the law) was named shmôth by the Jews. They customarily entitled the books of their sacred Scriptures by one or more of the opening words which for this book are w’ēlleh shmôth, “and these are the names …” The English name is derived from its
Genesis
GENESIS. The first book of the Bible and the first book of Moses is named from the Gr. title given to it in consequence of its subject matter. The name means “beginnings,” or the name could refer to the genealogies which are so prominent in the early chapters (cf. Gen 2:4 and 5:1 with Mt 1:1). In Heb.
Leviticus, Book of (Writing)
LEVITICUS, BOOK OF. The third book of the OT, so named by the Greek and Latin versions because of its emphasis on the Levitical priesthood. The Heb. title is wayyiqrā˒, “And He called,” the first word of the book. An integral part of the Pentateuch, the narrative of chaps. 8–10 and chap. 16 continue
Numbers, Book of (Writing)
NUMBERS, BOOK OF. This fourth book of Moses’ Pentateuch is described more accurately by the name it bears in the Heb. Bible, b-midbar, “in the wilderness.” The events take place in the wilderness (e.g., Sinai, 1:1; Zin, 20:1) and at the oases adjoining the wilderness, as, e.g., Kadesh-barnea (q.v.) in
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH. This designation, derived from two Gr. words, pente, “five,” and teuchos, “volume,” and meaning five volumes or books, is applied to the first five books of the Bible. Later Jews designated these books “the five fifths of the law.” Evidence for this fivefold division is as early as Philo
Torah
TORAH. The Heb word for “law” perhaps comes from the causative form of the verb yārâ, “to throw,” “to shoot (arrows)”; at any rate, the Hiph˓ı̂l verb form hôrâ means “to point, guide, instruct, teach.” Hence, authoritative guidance is law. The noun tora appears 215 times in the OT. Torah is used
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Deuteronomy, Book of (Writing)
DEUTERONOMY, BOOK OF. The name Deuteronomy derives from the lxx rendering of a phrase in 17:18. The king was to prepare ‘a copy of this law’. The phrase is rendered in Greek as to deuteronomion touto, lit. this second law. Subsequently the Vulgate rendered the Greek as deuteronomium. The contents of
Leviticus, Book of (Writing)
LEVITICUS, BOOK OF. The third book of the Pentateuch is referred to in Jewish usage as wayyiqrā’ (‘and he called’), this being the word with which it begins in Hebrew. In the Mishnah the book is variously named tôraṯ kôhanîm, ‘priests’ law’, sēp̱er kôhanîm, ‘priests’ book’, tôraṯ haqqorbānîm,
Numbers, Book of (Writing)
NUMBERS, BOOK OF. The synagogue named this book after its first word or after one of the first words (wayeḏabbēr, ‘and he spoke’; or bemiḏbar, ‘in the desert’). The Gk. translators called it arithmoi, ‘numbers’. Where the four other parts of the Pentateuch are concerned, the Gk. names are commonly
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH. The first five books of the OT (Gn., Ex., Lv., Nu., Dt.) constitute the first and most important section of the threefold Jewish *Canon. Usually called by the Jews sēp̱er hattôrâ, ‘the book of the law’, or hattôrâ, ‘the law’ (see KB, p. 403, for suggested derivations of the word, which
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Deuteronomy, Book Of
Deuteronomy, Book ofThe fifth and final book of the Pentateuch. From both a literary and theological perspective, it is hard to overestimate the importance of the book of Deuteronomy. While it may not be a literary masterpiece itself, its direct literary influence is diffused through a good portion
Exodus, Book Of
Exodus, Book ofThe second book in the OT and one of five books that make up the Torah or Pentateuch. The title “Exodus” is from the Greek or LXX translation of the Hebrew text (MT) and emphasizes the event of Israel leaving Egypt. In Hebrew the title of the book is Šĕmôṯ, from the opening words,
Leviticus, Book Of
Leviticus, Book ofThe third of the Five Books of Moses that comprise the Pentateuch or Torah. Leviticus forms the core of the Priestly source (P), which comprises about half of the Torah, beginning at Exod. 24:15, extending through most of Numbers, and including scattered interpolations in Genesis and
Numbers, Book Of
Numbers, Book ofThe fourth book of the Pentateuch. It recounts the story of the Israelites’ preparations for departure from Mt. Sinai and their journey through the wilderness to the Plains of Moab, across the Jordan River from the city of Jericho.
Pentateuch
PentateuchThe first five books (Gk. pénta teúchos) of the Bible, the Torah (Heb. “law, instruction”). In antiquity these books were ascribed to Mosaic authorship (e.g., 4QMMT C.10; Josephus Ag. Ap. 1.39; Luke 24:44), hence the traditional designation, Five Books of Moses. The content of these books
Torah
Torah (Heb. tôrâ)A name (Heb. “instruction, guidance, law”) ascribed to the first division of the Hebrew canon, the five books of Moses or the Pentateuch. In a more general sense, torah indicates the divine law or instruction according to which Israel was to live as stipulated in the covenant.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Deuteronomy, Book of (Writing)
Deuteronomy, Book of. †The fifth book of the Old Testament and the last of the Pentateuch, the “five books of Moses.”
Exodus, Book of (Writing)
Exodus, Book of. †The second book of the Old Testament, and the second of the Pentateuch or Five Books of Moses. The English title derives from Gk. éxodos “departure,” the name accorded it by the LXX (cf. Vulg. Lat. Exodus) on the basis of its theme of divine deliverance (cf. Exod. 19:1).
Genesis, Book of (Writing)
Genesis, Book of. †First book of the Old Testament and of the Law or Pentateuch.
Leviticus, Book of (Writing)
LEVITICUS [lə vĭtˊə kəs], BOOK OF † The third book of the Pentateuch and of the Old Testament.
Pentateuch
Pentateuch [pĕnˊ tə tōōk].† The first five books of the Old Testament (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), constituting the first and most important of the three divisions of the Hebrew canon.
Torah
Torah (Heb. tôrâ “instruction, guidance, law”).* A name ascribed to the first division of the Hebrew canon, the five books of Moses or the Pentateuch. In a more general sense, torah indicates the divine law or instruction according to which Israel was to live as stipulated in the covenant. See
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Torah
TORAH תורהI. The word Torah is usually connected with the root yrh, which means “to point, direct, teach” in the Hiphil conjugation. If so, the noun properly means “instruction, teaching, direction”. Since Torah is used most frequently of specific cultic instructions, as well as the demands of the covenant,
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Deuteronomy
DEUTERONOMY (Greek, “second law”) The fifth and last book of the Pentateuch. Its title is derived from Deut 17:18 as translated in the Septuagint: the king “shall write for himself in a book this law [to deuteronomion].”Deuteronomy records the details of the second covenant under Moses that was made
Exodus, Book Of
EXODUS, BOOK OF The second book of the Old Testament and the second book of the Pentateuch. The Hebrew title for Exodus is wěʾlleh šěmôt, meaning “and these are the names” (Exod 1:1), which restates Gen 46:8: “Now these are the names of the Israelites, Jacob and his offspring, who came to Egypt.” The
Genesis, Book Of
GENESIS, BOOK OF The first book of the Bible. Genesis is known in the Hebrew as bĕrēʾšît, meaning “in the beginning.” The Greek Septuagint version calls the book genesis, meaning “origin” or “birth”; the Latin Vulgate and English versions follow the Septuagint. The title is apt: the book deals with
Leviticus, Book Of
LEVITICUS, BOOK OF The third book of the Pentateuch. It contains laws regarding sacrifices, legal purity, holiness, atonement, the redemption of offerings, and other subjects. Levitical laws provided directives for all aspects of religious observance and for the manner in which the Israelites were to
Numbers, Book Of
NUMBERS, BOOK OF The fourth book of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament. Numbers takes its name from the censuses recounted at the beginning and near the end of the book (chaps. 1–4 and 26). This book continues the story of the Exodus and ends with the arrival of the Israelites just outside the Promised
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH The name Christian tradition gives to the first five books of the Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. In Hebrew, they are known collectively as tôrâ, meaning “instruction” or “teaching.” “Tôrâ” was routinely translated nomos, “law,” in the Greek Septuagint. The Greek
Torah
TORAH The Pentateuch. The name transliterates the Hebrew tôrâ, meaning “instruction.”