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Adder
Basilisk
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Adder
Adder. Any of several kinds of poisonous and nonpoisonous snakes, especially the common viper of Europe and Asia.See Animals.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Adder
Adder [Heb. peṯen (Ps. 58:4; 91:13), ṣip̱‘ônî (Prov. 23:32; Isa. 11:8; 59:5; Jer. 8:17), ṣep̱a‘ (Isa. 14:29)]; AV also COCKATRICE; NEB ASP, COBRA, SNAKE, VIPER. One or more kinds of poisonous snake. It is impossible to tell in any case just what species is meant, but it must be remembered that
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Adder
ADDER* Any of several kinds of poisonous and nonpoisonous snakes, especially the common viper of Europe and Asia. See Animals.
Basilisk
BASILISK* Word used to translate a particular Hebrew word in two passages of some editions of the kjv (Prv 23:32; Is 14:29). “Basilisk” refers to a kind of lizard and is a mistranslation. It has been corrected to read “adder” or “viper” in later kjv printings and in more recent translations.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Adder
adder, a poisonous snake. The term is often used in poetic passages and in texts conveying symbolic imagery (Pss. 58:4; 91:13; Prov. 23:32; Isa. 14:29).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Adder
Ad´der. This word is used for any poisonous snake, and is applied in this general sense by the translators of the Authorized Version. The word adder occurs five times in the text of the Authorized Version (see below), and three times in the margin as synonymous with cockatrice, viz., Isa. 11:8; 14:29;
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Adder
AD´DER (adʹder). The rendering in the KJV of four Heb. words, each of which probably signifies some kind of venomous serpent. See Animal Kingdom: Serpent.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Adder
Adder(Ps. 140:3; Rom. 3:13, “asp”) is the rendering of, (1.) Akshub (“coiling” or “lying in wait”), properly an asp or viper, found only in this passage. (2.) Pethen (“twisting”), a viper or venomous serpent identified with the cobra (Naja haje) (Ps. 58:4; 91:13); elsewhere “asp.” (3.) Tziphoni (“hissing”)
Basilisk
Basilisk(in R.V., Isa. 11:8; 14:29; 59:5; Jer. 8:17), the “king serpent,” as the name imports; a fabulous serpent said to be three spans long, with a spot on its head like a crown. Probably the yellow snake is intended. (See COCKATRICE.)
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Adder
Adderadder, a poisonous snake. The kjv translates four different Hebrew words for species of serpents that cannot be precisely identified with the word ‘adder’ (e.g., Gen. 49:17; Ps. 140:3; cf. Rom. 3:13, where the rsv has ‘asp’). The words cluster as parallel terms in poetry where the snakes symbolize
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ADDER
ADDER<ad’-er> ( עַכְשׁוּב‎ [̀akhshubh] (Psalm 140:3); פֶּתֶן‎ [pethen] (Psalm 58:4); צִפְעוֹנִי‎ [tsiph̀oni] (Proverbs 23:32); שְׁפִיפֹן‎ [shephiphon] (Genesis 49:17); צֶפַע‎ [tsephà] (King James Version margin; Isaiah 14:29)): This word is used for several Hebrew originals. In each case a
BASILISK
BASILISK<baz’-i-lisk> (צֶפַע‎ [tsephà], צִפְעוֹנִי‎ [tsiph̀oni], from obsolete root צָפַע‎ [tsaphà], “to hiss”: Isaiah 11:8; 14:29; 59:5; Jeremiah 8:17; Proverbs 23:32 m. In Proverbs 23:32, the King James Version has “adder,” margin “cockatrice”; in the other passages cited the King
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Adder
AdderPuff adder (Bitis arietans).Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.or northern viper, a small, stout-bodied, poisonous snake, Vipera berus, of the viper family Viperidae. (The name adder is sometimes applied to other groups resembling Vipera, such as the death adder, the puff adder, and the night adder.)
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Basilisk
Basilisk. The king of serpents (Greek, basileus, a king), supposed to have the power of “looking any one dead on whom it fixed its eyes.” Hence Dryden makes Clytus say to Alexander, “Nay, frown not so; you cannot look me dead.” This creature is called a king from having on its head a mitre-shaped crest.
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Adder
Adʹder, a general name for several species of venomous serpents belonging to the viper family. In our English version of the Old Testament it is the rendering of four different Hebrew words, each indicating some specific difference. The first of these words occurs only in Ps. 140:3, and expresses the
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