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Acts of Thaddeus
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical, sixth-century Greek version of the Syriac legend in which Abgar V, king of Edessa, supposedly corresponds with Jesus. Earlier versions of this legend are preserved in Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History 1.13 (early fourth century), and also in the Doctrine of Addai (around ad 400). This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period, nor could it have been based on its late date.(For further information on other works like the Acts of Thaddeus, see this article: Apocryphal Acts. For further details on the legendary correspondence between Christ and Abgar, see this article: Christ and Abgar, Letters of. For information on the process of canonization, see this article: Canon, New Testament.)
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Acts of Thaddeus
Acts of Thaddeus A noncanonical, sixth-century Greek version of the Syriac legend in which Abgar V, king of Edessa, supposedly corresponds with Jesus. Earlier versions of this legend are preserved in Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History 1.13 (early fourth century), and also in the Doctrine of Addai (around
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Thaddeus, Acts Of
Thaddeus, Acts ofA 5th-century Greek writing developed on the basis of the legend that the disciple Thaddeus was to evangelize Edessa as the fulfillment of a promise made by Jesus to King Agbar. The legend may be found in Eusebius (HE 1.13.11–22; 2.1.5–7).Watson E. Mills
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Thaddeus, Acts of (Writing)
Thaddeus, Acts of. A fifth or sixth-century Greek writing developed on the basis of the legend of Thaddeus’ evangelization of Edessa as the fulfillment of a promise made by Jesus to Agbar, king of Edessa. This legend is also represented in Eusebius HE i.13; ii.1, 5–7 and in a late third- or early fourth-century
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Thaddaeus, Acts of (Writing)
Thaddaeus, Acts of. A 6th-cent. Greek version and development of the Syriac legend regarding Abgar V, king of Edessa (A.D. 9–46), who is said to have exchanged correspondence with Jesus, as a result of which Addai (Thaddaeus) was sent to Edessa and performed numerous miracles, including the healing of
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
THADDAEUS, ACTS OF
THADDAEUS, ACTS OF thad´ee-uhs. A 6th-cent. ce Greek elaboration of the interaction between Jesus and King Abgar of Edessa. When the king requests healing, Jesus sends Thaddaeus, one of the seventy, to Edessa, where he establishes Christianity. Earlier versions of the story can be found in Eusebius (Hist.