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Acts of John
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical work that purports to depict the miraculous activities of the Apostle John, son of Zebedee, on the way to and in the city of Ephesus. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period and Eusebius, the first of the church fathers to refer to it directly, condemned it as heretical (Ecclesiastical History 3.25.6).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Acts of John
Acts of John A noncanonical work that purports to depict the miraculous activities of the Apostle John, son of Zebedee, on the way to and in the city of Ephesus. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period and Eusebius, the first of the church fathers to refer to it directly,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
John, Acts Of
John, Acts ofOne of several apocryphal works purportedly written by Leucius Charinus. It was probably written in Greek in the late 2nd or early 3rd century c.e. Its provenance is unknown.The Acts of John relates the mission, miraculous deeds, and peaceful death of the apostle in Asia Minor. John heals
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
John, Acts of (Writing)
John, Acts of *A third-century apocryphal book that purports to supplement the canonical book of Acts by giving a history of all the acts of the apostle John. The work is attributed as early as the fourth century to Leucius Charinus, purportedly an eyewitness of the events recorded and author of several
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
John, Acts of
John, Acts of. A Greek apocryphal treatise, not later than the early 3rd cent., describing events in the life of the Apostle St *John. Large parts of it have come down to us in a number of scattered MSS, all incomplete. A fragment, discovered by M. R. James in 1886, contains an extended account of
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
John, Acts of (Writing)
John, Acts of. Two different apocryphal works bear this title. The earlier one, first attested before the end of the 3rd cent. as part of a Manichean collection, is preserved in fragmentary fashion in various languages. It purports to give an account of the travels, missionary work, and death of the
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
JOHN, ACTS OF
JOHN, ACTS OF. Modern scholarship dates the Acts of John between the 2nd and the early 4th cent. ce. Clement of Alexandria (d. 215 ce) might have known Acts of John 93 (Fragments 3). Eusebius (d. ca. 339 ce) termed it heretical (Hist. eccl. 3.25.6) and the Coptic Manichaean Psalm-Book (ca. 340) listed