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Acts of Andrew
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical work that purports to depict the events of the Apostle Andrew’s journeys from Pontus to his martyrdom in Patras. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period. Eusebius, the first of the church fathers to refer to it directly, condemned it as heretical (Ecclesiastical History 3.25.6–7).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Acts of Andrew
Acts of Andrew A noncanonical work that purports to depict the events of the Apostle Andrew’s journeys from Pontus to his martyrdom in Patras. This work was never widely authoritative in the early church period. Eusebius, the first of the church fathers to refer to it directly, condemned it as heretical
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Andrew, Acts of
ANDREW, ACTS OF. The Acts of Andrew is an important account of Andrew’s travels, beginning in Pontus and ending in Patras, Achaea, where the apostle is martyred. Andrew goes from city to city, performing miracles, preaching the word of salvation, and converting the crowds.He travels by way of Amasia,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Andrew, Acts Of
Andrew, Acts ofOne of several apocryphal books (ca. mid-2nd century) of the acts of various individual apostles. It is first mentioned by Eusebius (HE 3.25–26), who regarded it as heretical. No complete manuscript survives, but it can be pieced together in large part and Gregory of Tours’ Liber de Miraculis
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Andrew, Acts of (Writing)
Andrew, Acts of. One of the five apocryphal acts of the apostles traditionally attributed to Leucias Charinus. It was composed in Greek during the third century A.D. (some would date it ca. 190) in Greece or Asia Minor. Probably the longest of the apocryphal acts, the book survives only in fragments
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Andrew, Acts of St
Andrew, Acts of St., An apocryphal book dating probably from the late 2nd cent., and held in favour among the *Encratites. In its original form it no longer survives, but fragments are contained in various Greek MSS, parts survive in Coptic and Armenian translations, and *Gregory of Tours gives a long
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Acts of Andrew
Acts of Andrew. For this and similar apocryphal works, see under the name of the person (e.g., Andrew, Acts of; Pilate, Acts of).
Andrew, Acts of (Writing)
Andrew, Acts of. This work is first mentioned by Eusebius (Eccl. Hist. 3.25.6) among writings put forward by the heretics, of which, he says, no writer in the ecclesiastical succession has condescended to make any mention; in his opinion they are not even to be ranked with the spurious books (notha)