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Abrahamic Promise
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
God’s promise to the first patriarch, Abraham, which functions as the basis for Israel’s covenant with Yahweh.The Abrahamic covenant marks a transition in Genesis’ account of God’s initiated redemption of the world (Gen 12:1–3, 7; 13:14–17; 15:4–21; 17:4–16; 22:15–18). Initially made to the patriarch while he was still under the name Abram (“exalted father”; 12:1–3; 13:14–18), the promise would later be expanded to a cosmic dimension in such a way as to necessitate a change of title: Abram becomes Abraham (“father of many”; 17:5–8). While the promise/covenant remains with Israel alone, it moves from the particular of Gen 12:1–3 to the universal of Gen 17:5–6. In the context of the entire biblical story, the Abrahamic promise can be seen as part of an “hourglass” shape: what begins with the universal (Gen 1–11) is subsequently narrowed to the particular (Gen 12:1–3; or more broadly, Gen 12 through the rest of the Old Testament), to open much later from within the early church (e.g., Acts 15; Wright, Climax, 16ff; Paul, 23).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Abrahamic Promise
Abrahamic Covenant God’s promise to the first patriarch, Abraham, which functions as the basis for Israel’s covenant with Yahweh.The Abrahamic covenant marks a transition in Genesis’ account of God’s initiated redemption of the world (Gen 12:1–3, 7; 13:14–17; 15:4–21; 17:4–16; 22:15–18). Initially made
Abrahamic Promise, Critical Issues
Abrahamic Covenant, Critical Issues Scholars debate several aspects of the Abrahamic covenant—its historicity, unity, conditionality, form, and subsequent use.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Abrahamic Promise
ABRAHAMIC PROMISE. The promises given to Abraham embodied in the Abrahamic covenant first appear in (Gen 12:1–3), followed by three important confirmations and applications (Gen 13:14–17; 15:1–7; 17:1–19). The Abrahamic promise, first, concerned Abraham himself (q.v.). He was promised great personal
Catholic Bible Dictionary
A. The Promise
A. The PromiseAbram came from Ur of the Chaldeans in Mesopotamia, as part of the clan of Terah (Gen 11:28). With his wife Sarai, his father, his brothers, and his nephew Lot, Abram moved from Ur to Haran in northern Mesopotamia (Gen 11:31). When Abram was seventy-five years old, he received a command
A. Three Promises
A. Three PromisesThe Lord made three promises to Abram: [1] “I will make of you a great nation”; [2] “I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse”; and [3] “in you all the families of the earth
B. The Abrahamic Covenant Anticipates Later Covenants
B. The Abrahamic Covenant Anticipates Later CovenantsSeen in the wider context of covenant history, the Abrahamic covenant anticipates the pattern of divine dealings with Israel and the nations in salvation history and the gradual fulfillment of the covenants in the Mosaic, Davidic, and New covenants:
Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times
Abrahamic Covenant
Abrahamic CovenantThe Abrahamic Covenant, also called “The Promise to Abraham,” plays a central role in biblical prophecy, providing one of the main prophetic themes that connect the Old Testament to the New. This covenant is presented in three central passages: Genesis 12:1–7; 15:1–20; and 17:1–8.
Seed of Abraham
Seed of AbrahamThe Hebrew word for “seed” (zeraʿ) plays an important role in the theology surrounding the Abrahamic Covenant (see abrahamic covenant). The word literally refers to the seeds of plants, but it is used often figuratively to refer to human descendants. English translations such as the NIV
Key passages
Ge 12:1–3

And Yahweh said to Abram, “Go out from your land and from your relatives, and from the house of your father, to the land that I will show you. And I will make you a great nation, and I will bless you, and I will make your name great. And you will be a blessing. And I will bless …