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Abode of the Dead
Place of the Dead • Underworld
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Dead, Abode of the
DEAD, ABODE OF THE. Several terms are used to denote the abode of the dead in the Hebrew Bible, and they often occur in parallelism to one another. The most common is šĕʾôl. Both šĕʾôl and māwet, “Death” are often used in Hebrew to refer to the realm of death as well as to the personified chthonic
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Dead, Abode of the
Dead, Abode of the. Term covering a number of descriptive biblical images of the whereabouts of those who have died. Those images include Sheol and “the pit” in the OT, plus Hades, Gehenna, Paradise, and “Abraham’s bosom” in the NT. As their understanding of God advanced, the Hebrews’ idea of what happens
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Dead, Place of the
DEAD, PLACE OF THE Term covering a number of descriptive biblical images of the whereabouts of those who have died. Those images include Sheol and “the pit” in the OT, plus hades, Gehenna, paradise, and “Abraham’s bosom” in the NT. As their understanding advanced, the Hebrews’ idea of what happens at
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Dead, Abode of The
Dead, Abode of the. The concept develops across Scripture. In the OT one descends at death to Sheol, which may simply refer to the grave (Num. 16:30, 33) but usually means the underworld to which one “goes down” (Gen. 42:38; Prov. 15:24). Sheol is not just a place of darkness and forgetfulness (Job 10:21–22;
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
DEAD, ABODE OF THE
DEAD, ABODE OF THE. Every ANE culture believed in an AFTERLIFE for the dead, who journeyed to a special abode to begin a new existence. The journey to the abode of the dead explains some of the grave goods, which are common in burials in the area, as provisions for their journey or for setting up their