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Abgar
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Also written as Agbarus and Augarus. A name common to several kings of Edessa. According to legend, Abgar V, a son of Uchomo, sent a letter to Jesus, professing belief that he was the Messiah, asking Him to come and heal Abgar from an incurable disease, and inviting him at the same time to take refuge from His enemies in this city. After Jesus’ death, the disciple Judas Thaddaeus was sent by the Apostle Thomas to visit Abgar (see Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, 1.13).(For further information on this legend and the pseudonymous correspondence affiliated with it, see this article: Christ and Abgar, Letters of.)
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Abgar
Abgar (Αβγαρος, Abgaros). Also written as Agbarus and Augarus. A name common to several kings of Edessa. According to legend, Abgar V, a son of Uchomo, sent a letter to Jesus, professing belief that he was the Messiah, asking Him to come and heal Abgar from an incurable disease, and inviting him at the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Abgar
Abgar abʹgär; ABGARUS ab-gäʹrəs; ABAGARUS ə-bagʹər-əs [GK. Abgaros]; written also AGBARUS; AUGARUS. A name common to several kings (toparchs) of Edessa, Mesopotamia. One of these, Abgar, a son of Uchomo, the seventeenth (14th?) of twenty kings, according to legend (see Eusebius HE i.13) sent a letter
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Abgar
Abgar (Gk. Abgaros)Common title of kings of Edessa, the capital of Osrhoene, a small kingdom at the northern bend of the Euphrates River (modern Turkey). Eusebius (HE 1.13) reports that the archives of Edessa contained copies of correspondence between Abgar Ukkama (Abgar V “the Black”) and Jesus in
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Abgar
Abgar [ăbˊgər] (Gk. Abgaros). A king of Uchama, the son of Uchamo, who reigned over Edessa (ca. A.D. 9–46). According to a legend (Eusebius HE i. 13), Abgar exchanged letters with Jesus concerning the possibility of Jesus’ healing his terrible disease. In his reply the Lord promised to send one
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Abgar, Legend of
Abgar, Legend of. An old tradition ascribes to Abgar V (reigned 4 bcAD 7 and 13–50), one of the kings of *Edessa, an exchange of letters with the Lord. The King, being ill, wrote to Christ asking Him to visit and heal him; He, though declining to come Himself, promised that, after His Ascension,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ABGAR; ABGARUS; ABAGARUS
ABGAR; ABGARUS; ABAGARUS<ab’-gar>, <ab-ga’-rus>, <a-bag’-a-rus> ([Αβγαρος, Abgaros]): Written also Agbarus and Augarus. A king of Edessa. A name common to several kings (toparchs) of Edessa, Mesopotamia. One of these, Abgar, a son of Uchomo, the seventeenth (14th?) of twenty kings, according to the
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Abgar
Abgar.—A name, like Pharao or Cæsar, borne by the kings of Edessa, a small kingdom in the southwest of Mesopotamia. Eusebius (Ch. Hist. i. 13), gives the reputed correspondence between (the fifteenth) Abgar and our Saviour, relative to the cure of a former leprosy. Christ promises to send, after His
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
A′BGARUS
A′BGARUS, Toparch of Edessa, supposed by Eusebius to have been the author of a letter written to our Saviour, which he found in a church at Edessa and translated from the Syriac. The letter is believed to be spurious. It is given by Eusebius. (Hist. Eccl. i. 13.)[A. J. C.]
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Abgar
ABGAR.—Between the years b.c. 99 and a.d. 217 eight (or ten) kings or toparchs of Edessa in Osrhoëne bore this name. It is with the toparch that ruled in the time of our Saviour, Abgar Ukkâmâ (‘the Black,’ e. b.c. 13 to a.d. 50 [Gutschmid], b.c. 9 to a.d. 46 [Dionysius of Telnahar]), that we are here
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Abgar
ABGAR, the name of several kings of Edessa, who reigned, according to the chronology of the Chronicle of that city, at various periods, ranging from b.c. 99 to a.d. 217. The etymology and origin of this word are doubtful; derivations have been sought for it in Armenian, Syriac, and Arabic. In the Armenian
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Abgar, King
ABGAR, KINGAbgar was the customary name given to various kings of Edessa. The passages below apparently refer to two different Abgars. The first one refers to Abgar the Black, c. A.D. 13–50.King Abgar was renowned for his valor among the nations that were east of the Euphrates. However, his body was
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Abgar
AbgarToparch of → Urfa, Abgar V Ukkama (“the black”), an important (non-Christian) figure in early Syriac-Christian history; Wardle (2011 [“Abgarids”]) gives the dates of his reign as 4 b.c.a.d. 7 and a.d. 13–50. Eusebius quotes the contents of a letter (HE 1.13.6–9) that Abgar V allegedly wrote to