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A Refugee
Any person living or seeking safety in a city of refuge.
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Refuge
Refuge [ (nouns) Heb. maḥseh or maḥaseh (Ps. 14:6; 46:1 [MT 2]; 104:18; Prov. 14:26; Isa. 4:6; 28:15, 17; Jer. 17:17; Joel 3:16 [MT 4:16]; etc.), māʾōz—‘place of safety,’ ‘mountain fort’ (2 S. 22:33; Ps. 28:8; 37:39; 43:2; Isa. 17:10; Nah. 3:11), mānôs—‘place of escape’ (2 S. 22:3; Ps. 59:16 [MT
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Refuge
refuge, a place of safety or protection from enemies. Six of the levitical cities were designated as cities of refuge, where one who accidently caused a death might seek asylum from avengers until the case could be judged by the elders of the city (Josh. 20:7–9). If the person was found to be innocent
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Refuge
RefugeShelter or relief from danger or anxiety. The OT concept owes its richness to several Hebrew words: mikgāḇ, a high rock (e.g., Isa. 33:16); măʿōnâ, a secure dwelling place (e.g., Deut. 33:27); mānôs, a place to flee to (Ps. 142:4 [MT 5]); and maḥseh, a shelter (Isa. 4:6).Zion is a refuge
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Refuge
Refuge (Heb. nouns maḥseh, mānôs, mā˒ôz, verb ḥāsâ).† Shelter or protection from danger or distress. The main thought underlying the Hebrew terms translatable as “refuge” is security. Such words are applied in the Old Testament to places of physical shelter, as for those seeking protection
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Refuge
Refugerefuge, a place of safety or protection from enemies. Six of the levitical cities were designated as cities of refuge (Josh. 20:7–9) where one who accidently caused a death might seek asylum from avengers until his case could be judged by the elders of the city. If he was found to be innocent
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Refuge
RefugeA safe place into which to run is a universal need for all creatures, including human beings. We can all remember childhood games in which there was a place where one was “safe” and could not be touched by a pursuer or opponent. “Out there” was danger, but to reach the sanctuary or haven (even
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
REFUGE
REFUGE<ref’-uj>: A place of resort and safety. The principal words in the Old Testament are [מַחְסֶה‎, machceh] (Psalm 14:6; 46:1; 62:7, 8; Isaiah 4:6, etc.), and [מָנוֹס‎, manoc] (2 Samuel 22:3; Psalm 59:16, etc.), both applied chiefly to God as a “refuge” for His people. For the King
Compton’s Encyclopedia
refugees
refugeesIn 1945, refugees from Eastern Europe flee to freedom across a war-damaged railroad bridge over the …Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.In the early 21st century there were nearly 20 million refugees worldwide—roughly one out of every 300 persons on Earth. Refugees are homeless people who have
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Refugee
refugee. A person displaced or forced to move from one locale to another by *tyranny, harassment, *persecution, *war or any other combination of causes that have deprived him or her of home, *property, way of life or religious *freedom. Ethicists debate such issues as the causes that produce refugees,
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Refuge
refuge. This English term, which is especially common in the book of Psalms, is used to render a variety of Hebrew words, in particular the noun maḥseh H4726 (Ps. 14:6 et al.); the expression “to take refuge” translates the Hebrew verb ḥāsâ H2879 (Ps. 2:12 et al.). Such terms express security from
Dictionary of Luther and the Lutheran Traditions
Refugees
RefugeesBecause of its own refugee heritage and its embrace of the biblical and theological grounds for “welcoming the stranger,” the Lutheran Church has often exercised a special engagement with refugees. The Old Testament presents the story of a refugee people, the people of Israel who fled from Egypt.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Refuge
REFUGE, ref′ūj: A place of resort and safety. The principal words in the OT are מַחְסֶה‎, maḥṣeh (Ps 14:6; 46:1; 62:7, 8; Isa 4:6, etc), and מָנוֹס‎, mānōṣ (2 S 22:3; Ps 59:16, etc), both applied chiefly to God as a “refuge” for His people. For AV “refuge” in Dt 33:27, RV has “dwelling-place,” and