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A Perfumer
Any person making a living through mixing and selling ointments and perfumes.
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Perfume; Perfumer
Perfume; Perfumer [Heb. rôqē (a)ḥ (Ex. 30:25, 35; 37:29; Eccl. 10:1), raqqāḥ (1 S. 8:13; Neh. 3:8), mirqaḥaṯ (2 Ch. 16:14), riqqû (a)ḥ (Isa. 57:9), rî (a)ḥ (Ex. 30:38), nûp̱ (Prov. 7:17), qeṭōreṯ (Prov. 27:9), mequṭṭereṯ (Cant. 3:6), bātê hannep̱eš (“perfume boxes,” Isa. 3:20),
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Apothecary
APOTHECARY* kjv rendering of “perfumer” in Exodus 30:25, 35; 37:29; 2 Chronicles 16:14; Nehemiah 3:8; and Ecclesiastes 10:1.
Confection, Confectionaries
CONFECTION*, CONFECTIONARIES* kjv rendering of perfumer in Exodus 30:35 and 1 Samuel 8:13. See Perfumer.
Perfumer
PERFUMER* Also known as an “apothecary” (Ex 30:25, kjv) or a “confectionary” (1 Sm 8:13, kjv). This person prepared oils, powders, and mixtures for medicinal use, for perfumes and cosmetics, and for religious use in incense. A wide variety of plants, when crushed, provided oils or powders giving off
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Perfumers
perfumers, traders who compounded and dispensed a variety of aromatic substances. Perfumers played an important role in ancient Israel, where the aromatic oils and incense they provided were required for religious as well as cosmetic and medicinal use, including embalming (2 Chron. 16:14). The holy anointing
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Confectionary
CONFECTIONARY. This term is found only once in the KJV of the OT. 1 Sam 8:13 reads: “He will take your daughters to be confectionaries” (“perfumers,” ASV). They seemed to have formed part of a perfumers’ guild (Neh 3:8, 2 Chr 16:14).
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Apothecary
Apothecaryrendered in the margin and the Revised Version “perfumer,” in Ex. 30:25; 37:29; Eccl. 10:1. The holy oils and ointments were prepared by priests properly qualified for this office. The feminine plural form of the Hebrew word is rendered “confectionaries” in 1 Sam. 8:13.
Confectionaries
Confectionariesonly in 1 Sam. 8:13, those who make confections, i.e., perfumers, who compound species and perfumes.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Perfumers
Perfumersperfumers (kjv: ‘apothecaries’), traders who compounded and dispensed a variety of aromatic substances. Perfumers played an important role in ancient Israel, where the aromatic oils and incense they compounded were required for religious as well as cosmetic and medicinal use, including embalming
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
APOTHECARY
APOTHECARY<a-poth’-e-ka-ri>: Found in English Versions of the Bible eight times in the Old Testament and Apocrypha for Hebrew word rendered more accurately “perfumer” by the Revised Version (British and American) in Exodus 30:25, 35; 37:29; Ecclesiastes 10:1; though inconsistently retained
CONFECTION; CONFECTIONARY
CONFECTION; CONFECTIONARY<kon-fek’-shun>, <kon-fek’-shun-a-ri> ([רֹקַה‎, roqach] “perfume,” “spice,” [רַקָּהָה‎, raqqahah], feminine “perfumer”):1. “Confection” is found in the King James Version only and but once “a confection after the art of the apothecary” (Exodus 30:35; the Revised
PERFUME; PERFUMER
PERFUME; PERFUMER<pur’-ium>, <per-fum’> ([קְטֹרֶת, qeToreth] [קָטַר, qaTar] literally, “incense”): The ancients were fond of sweet perfumes of all kinds (Proverbs 27:9), and that characteristic is still especially true of the people of Bible lands. Perfumed oils were rubbed on the body and feet.
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Apothecary
A-pothʹe-ca-ry, a perfumer or dealer in perfumes (Ex. 30:25, 35; 37:29; Eccles. 10:1). See Ointment.
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Apothecary
APOTHECARY (Ȧ pŏthʹ ə câr y) KJV translation of a word translated as “perfumer” in modern versions (Exod. 30:25, 35; 37:29; 2 Chron. 16:14; Neh. 3:8; Eccles. 10:1). See Perfume, Perfumer.
Perfume, Perfumer
PERFUME, PERFUMER Modern translation of a word translated as “apothecary” by the KJV (Exod. 30:25, 35; 37:29; 2 Chron. 16:14; Neh. 3:8; Eccles. 10:1). Perfumes mentioned in the Bible include aloes, balsam (or balm), bdellium, calamus (or sweet or fragment cane), camel’s thorn, cinnamon (or cassia), frankincense,
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Apothecary
apothecary. KJV term for Hebrew rāqaḥ H8379, a word that modern translations usually render with “perfumer” (e.g., Exod. 30:25). See perfume.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Apothecary
APOTHECARY, a-pothʹē̇-kā̇-ri: Found in EV eight times in the OT and Apoc for Heb word rendered more accurately “perfumer” by RV in Ex 30:25, 35; 37:29; Eccl 10:1; though inconsistently retained elsewhere (2 Ch 16:14 ERV; Neh 3:8 ERV [cf m]); Sir 38:8; 49:1). See Perfumer.
Confection, Confectionary
CONFECTION, kon-fekʹshun, CONFECTIONARY, kon-fekʹshun-ā̇-ri (רֹקַח‎, rōḳaḥ, “perfume,” “spice,” רַקָּהָה‎, raḳḳāhāh, fem. “perfumer”):(1) “Confection” is found in AV only, and but once “a c. after the art of the apothecary” (Ex 30:35; RV “perfume”); but the RV renders 1 Ch 9:30, “the c. [AV “ointment”]
Perfume, Perfumer
PERFUME, pûr′fūm, pēr-fūm′, PERFUMER (קְטֹרֶת‎, eṭōreth, קָטַר‎, ḳāṭar, lit. “incense”): The ancients were fond of sweet perfumes of all kinds (Prov 27:9), and that characteristic is still esp. true of the people of Bible lands. Perfumed oils were rubbed on the body and feet. At a feast in ancient