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New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update

Matthew 9:18–30

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Miracles of Healing

18 aWhile He was saying these things to them, 1a synagogue 2official came and 3bbowed down before Him, and said, “My daughter has just died; but come and lay Your hand on her, and she will live.”

19 Jesus got up and began to follow him, and so did His disciples.

20 And a woman who had been suffering from a hemorrhage for twelve years, came up behind Him and touched athe 1fringe of His 2cloak;

21 for she was saying 1to herself, “If I only atouch His garment, I will 2get well.”

22 But Jesus turning and seeing her said, “Daughter, atake courage; byour faith has 1made you well.” 2At once the woman was 3made well.

23 When Jesus came into the 1official’s house, and saw athe flute-players and the crowd in noisy disorder,

24 He said, “Leave; for the girl ahas not died, but is asleep.” And they began laughing at Him.

25 But awhen the crowd had been sent out, He entered and btook her by the hand, and the girl 1got up.

26 aThis news spread throughout all that land.

27 As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed Him, crying out, “Have mercy on us, aSon of David!”

28 When He entered the house, the blind men came up to Him, and Jesus * said to them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” They * said to Him, “Yes, Lord.”

29 Then He touched their eyes, saying, 1It shall be done to you aaccording to your faith.”

30 And their eyes were opened. And Jesus asternly warned them: “See that no one knows about this!

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a
1

Or one

2

Lit ruler

3

Or worshiped

b
a
1

I.e. tassel fringe with a blue cord

2

Or outer garment

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Lit in herself

a
2

Lit be saved

a
b
1

Lit saved you

2

Lit from that hour

3

Lit saved

1

Lit ruler’s

a
a
a
b
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Or was raised up

a
a
*

A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

1

Or Let it be done; Gr command

a
a