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New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update

Matthew 26:57–68

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Jesus before Caiaphas

57 aThose who had seized Jesus led Him away to bCaiaphas, the high priest, where the scribes and the elders were gathered together.

58 But aPeter was following Him at a distance as far as the bcourtyard of the high priest, and entered in, and sat down with the 1cofficers to see the outcome.

59 Now the chief priests and the whole 1aCouncil kept trying to obtain false testimony against Jesus, so that they might put Him to death.

60 They did not find any, even though many false witnesses came forward. But later on atwo came forward,

61 and said, “This man stated, ‘aI am able to destroy the 1temple of God and to rebuild it 2in three days.’ ”

62 The high priest stood up and said to Him, “Do You not answer? What is it that these men are testifying against You?”

63 But aJesus kept silent. bAnd the high priest said to Him, “I 1cadjure You by dthe living God, that You tell us whether You are 2the Christ, ethe Son of God.”

64 Jesus * said to him, aYou have said it yourself; nevertheless I tell you, 1hereafter you will see bthe Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, and ccoming on the clouds of heaven.”

65 Then the high priest atore his 1robes and said, “He has blasphemed! What further need do we have of witnesses? Behold, you have now heard the blasphemy;

66 what do you think?” They answered, “aHe deserves death!”

67 aThen they bspat in His face and beat Him with their fists; and others 1slapped Him,

68 and said, “aProphesy to us, You 1Christ; who is the one who hit You?”

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a
b
a
b
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Or servants

c
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Or Sanhedrin

a
a
a
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Or sanctuary

2

Or after

a
b
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Or charge You under oath

c
d
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I.e. the Messiah

e
*

A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

a
1

Or from now on

b
c
a
1

Or outer garments

a
a
b
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Or beat Him with rods

a
1

I.e. the Messiah