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New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update

Mark 6:30–44

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30 aThe bapostles * gathered together with Jesus; and they reported to Him all that they had done and taught.

31 And He * said to them, “Come away by yourselves to a secluded place and rest a while.” (For there were many people coming and going, and athey did not even have time to eat.)

32 aThey went away in bthe boat to a secluded place by themselves.

Five Thousand Fed

33 The people saw them going, and many recognized them and ran there together on foot from all the cities, and got there ahead of them.

34 When Jesus went 1ashore, He asaw a large crowd, and He felt compassion for them because bthey were like sheep without a shepherd; and He began to teach them many things.

35 When it was already quite late, His disciples came to Him and said, “1This place is desolate and it is already quite late;

36 send them away so that they may go into the surrounding countryside and villages and buy themselves 1something to eat.”

37 But He answered them, “You give them something to eat!” aAnd they * said to Him, “Shall we go and spend two hundred 1bdenarii on bread and give them something to eat?”

38 And He * said to them, “How many loaves do you have? Go look!” And when they found out, they * said, “Five, and two fish.”

39 And He commanded them all to 1sit down by groups on the green grass.

40 They 1sat down in groups of hundreds and of fifties.

41 And He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up toward heaven, He ablessed the food and broke the loaves and He kept giving them to the disciples to set before them; and He divided up the two fish among them all.

42 They all ate and were satisfied,

43 and they picked up twelve full abaskets of the broken pieces, and also of the fish.

44 There were afive thousand men who ate the loaves.

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a
b
*

A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

a
a
b
1

Lit out

a
b
1

Lit The

1

Lit what they may eat

a
1

The denarius was equivalent to one day’s wage

b
1

Lit recline

1

Lit reclined

a
a
a