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New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update

Mark 11:12–24

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12 aOn the next day, when they had left Bethany, He became hungry.

13 Seeing at a distance a fig tree in leaf, He went to see if perhaps He would find anything on it; and when He came to it, He found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs.

14 He said to it, “May no one ever eat fruit from you again!” And His disciples were listening.

Jesus Drives Money Changers from the Temple

15 aThen they * came to Jerusalem. And He entered the temple and began to drive out those who were buying and selling in the temple, and overturned the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who were selling 1doves;

16 and He would not permit anyone to carry 1merchandise through the temple.

17 And He began to teach and say to them, “Is it not written, ‘aMy house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations’? bBut you have made it a robbers1den.”

18 The chief priests and the scribes heard this, and abegan seeking how to destroy Him; for they were afraid of Him, for bthe whole crowd was astonished at His teaching.

19 aWhen evening came, 1they would go out of the city.

20 aAs they were passing by in the morning, they saw the fig tree withered from the roots up.

21 Being reminded, Peter * said to Him, “aRabbi, look, the fig tree which You cursed has withered.”

22 And Jesus * answered saying to them, aHave faith in God.

23 aTruly I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and cast into the sea,’ and does not doubt in his heart, but believes that what he says is going to happen, it will be granted him.

24 “Therefore I say to you, aall things for which you pray and ask, believe that you have received them, and they will be granted you.

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A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

1

Lit the doves

1

Lit a vessel; i.e. a receptacle or implement of any kind

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b
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Lit cave

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b
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1

I.e. Jesus and His disciples

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