The NET Bible

2 Peter 3:4–7

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3:4 and saying,11 “Where is his promised return?12 For ever since13 our ancestors14 died,15 all things have continued as they were16 from the beginning of creation.” 3:5 For they deliberately suppress this fact,17 that by the word of God18 heavens existed long ago and an earth19 was formed out of water and by means of water. 3:6 Through these things20 the world existing at that time was destroyed when it was deluged with water. 3:7 But by the same word the present heavens and earth have been reserved for fire, by being kept for the day of judgment and destruction of the ungodly.21

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11

tn The present participle λέγοντες (legontes, “saying”) most likely indicates result. Thus, their denial of the Lord’s return is the result of their lifestyle. The connection to the false teachers of chapter 2 is thus made clear.

12

tn Grk “Where is the promise of his coming?” The genitive παρουσίας (parousias, “coming, advent, return”) is best taken as an attributed genitive (in which the head noun, promise, functions semantically as an adjective; see ExSyn 89–91).

13

tn The prepositional phrase with the relative pronoun, ἀφʼ ἧς (aph’ hēs), is used adverbially or conjunctively without antecedent (see BDAG 727 s.v. ὅς 1.k.).

14

tn Grk “fathers.” The reference could be either to the OT patriarchs or first generation Christians. This latter meaning, however, is unattested in any other early Christian literature.

15

tn The verb κοιμάω (koimaō) literally means “sleep,” but it is often used in the Bible as a euphemism for the death of a believer.

16

tn Grk “thus,” “in the same manner.”

17

tn The Greek is difficult at this point. An alternative is “Even though they maintain this, it escapes them that …” Literally the idea seems to be: “For this escapes these [men] who wish [it to be so].”

18

tn The word order in Greek places “the word of God” at the end of the sentence. See discussion in the note on “these things” in v. 6.

19

tn Or “land,” “the earth.”

20

tn The antecedent is ambiguous. It could refer to the heavens, the heavens and earth, or the water and the word. If the reference is to the heavens, the author is reflecting on the Genesis account about “the floodgates of the heavens” being opened (Gen 7:11). If the reference is to the heavens and earth, he is also thinking about the cosmic upheaval that helped to produce the flood (Gen 6:11). If the reference is to the water and the word, he is indicating both the means (water) and the cause (word of God). This last interpretation is the most likely since the final nouns of v. 5 are “water” and “word of God,” making them the nearest antecedents.

21

tn Grk “the ungodly people.”

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